UKBouldering.com

Grit route/highball Last Great Problems.... (Read 71752 times)

AndiT

Offline
  • ****
  • forum abuser
  • Posts: 666
  • Karma: +33/-3
When I spoke to Grimer last, I'm sure he did it in a very similar way/style/effort.

Somebody's Fool

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 1046
  • Karma: +123/-6
I don't really have any idea how often it gets done.  It was pure conjecture.  I'm practising for journalism...

grimer

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 1547
  • Karma: +141/-1
Yes I did it with a couple of falls ground up, a climbing style that is both authentic and aspirational, but also one that all climbers, no matter what their relative standard, can relate to, a few years ago. However, it felt fairly ok for the grade, but I think that was due to my patented Wingspans of Unreason.

Fiend

Offline
  • *
  • _
  • forum hero
  • Abominable sex magick practitioner and climbing heathen
  • Posts: 12831
  • Karma: +630/-66
  • Whut
This came on the same day as flashed ascents of Crack and Slab at Curbar, Kaluza Klein and Genocide.  Mad props.

 :thumbsup: Excellent work. Got to respect that.  :thumbsup:

AndiT

Offline
  • ****
  • forum abuser
  • Posts: 666
  • Karma: +33/-3
, a climbing style that is both authentic and aspirational, but also one that all climbers, no matter what their relative standard, can relate to, a few years ago.

and one ought to be ashamed for want of prudence, the episode is delightful to me in retrospect; gritstone has its romance no less than gritstone...

Pantontino

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 3327
  • Karma: +97/-1
    • www.northwalesbouldering.com
ground up, a climbing style that is both authentic and aspirational, but also one that all climbers, no matter what their relative standard, can relate to...

 ;D

I'm flattered to be quoted, even though you're probably taking the piss.

grimer

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 1547
  • Karma: +141/-1
Not at all   :)

Johnny Brown

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 11202
  • Karma: +662/-21
Not a last great problem, but continuing from earlier info... BB has done the other arete of his Cratcliffe prow today. More of a lip traverse, Ben balked at the earlier mantel options and continued to the same finish.



No name yet, though I've just had tenner on at Ladbrokes for 'Bullfinch backslash my chum the onion bhaji'. They gave me 3:1, fingers crossed!

dave

  • Guest
my close aquaintance the kumquat?

GCW

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • No longer a
  • Posts: 8171
  • Karma: +364/-38

Why does he always have the cheeky chappy face on?

Fiend

Offline
  • *
  • _
  • forum hero
  • Abominable sex magick practitioner and climbing heathen
  • Posts: 12831
  • Karma: +630/-66
  • Whut
Good effort BB. Liking the determined Yorkshire spots - he must be confident of all the pationess (?!) beneath ;)

whispering nic

Offline
  • **
  • player
  • Posts: 104
  • Karma: +6/-1






 :off: Old skool Cordless skinny matt with top rock boot cleaning surface I beleive  :-[

Bonjoy

Offline
  • *****
  • Global Moderator
  • forum hero
  • Leafy gent
  • Posts: 9791
  • Karma: +537/-8
Sweeet. Looks ace. Grade?

Jim

Offline
  • *****
  • Trusted Users
  • forum hero
  • Mostly Injured
  • Posts: 8629
  • Karma: +234/-18
  • Pregnant Horse
    • Bouldering POI's for tomtom
can you grade mud?

Somebody's Fool

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 1046
  • Karma: +123/-6
can you grade mud?

Yes.  I remember doing it at university.  It involved a contraption comprising several sieves (I believe they're also used by master bakers) stacked on top of each other.  Biggest holes at the top.  The mud is put in the top sieve and the whole lot is given a good shake (Again, a technique which should be familiar to master bakers).  Particles of a certain size, or grade, are then collected together in the relevant sieve.

Good effort again Ben.  Looks like the job interview gods picked me a shitty day to be in London.

Bonjoy

Offline
  • *****
  • Global Moderator
  • forum hero
  • Leafy gent
  • Posts: 9791
  • Karma: +537/-8
can you grade mud?
It was a still a bit wet then?

Jim

Offline
  • *****
  • Trusted Users
  • forum hero
  • Mostly Injured
  • Posts: 8629
  • Karma: +234/-18
  • Pregnant Horse
    • Bouldering POI's for tomtom
not wet, just really dirty

dave

  • Guest
can you grade mud?

Yes.  I remember doing it at university. 

i actually think Paz's PhD is(will be) in advanced soil mechanics.

Somebody's Fool

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 1046
  • Karma: +123/-6
He might well be able to elucidate my vague memory of a stack of sieves then.  I don't know how much detail Jim wanted.  Jim?

Paz

Offline
  • ****
  • junky
  • Posts: 965
  • Karma: +28/-3
I didn't like to brag. 

Basically I've seen the BS standard sieves used to classify different grades of sand, not mud.  And only in the literature, not in real life. 

I have therefore followed suit in copying pretty much the same language everyone else uses when describing them, only more confidently, and in doing so - whilst not rocking the boat or contributing anything productive to the exact area of sieves- have made it look pretty convincing to the lay person that I know lots more about sieves than they do, so hopefully they'll be both very impressed and too intimidated to ask me anything about it.

Now is the time therefore, for UKB to give me any interesting anecdotes about sieves in Civil Engineering or any other, some say lesser, Earth Sciences.  Whilst not making promises, I will include the best ones and this will earn you a dedication/thanks or even a citation (or at least karma). 



Johnny Brown

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 11202
  • Karma: +662/-21
I have used the sieves, though for soil, not mud. We graded mud by chewing it, I kid you not. I was reminded of this by Ray Mears' shroom-tripping mate recen demonstration.

Paul B

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 9237
  • Karma: +245/-4
I've had the joys of "SCEINTIFICALLY" testing and describing mud in many geotechnics labs (chewing didn't come into it though  :-\) and also using the aforementioned sieves to grade river bed sediments. Its not the most fun stuff.

Somebody's Fool

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 1046
  • Karma: +123/-6
I was reminded of this by Ray Mears' shroom-tripping mate recen demonstration.

What a legend.  Did you get your mud from those charitable boffins upstairs.  I hope you wrote what kind it was on a piece of paper before staggering off your bar stool, wheeling round and falling into a mind-altered coma.

SA Chris

Offline
  • *****
  • forum hero
  • Posts: 28195
  • Karma: +602/-11
    • http://groups.msn.com/ChrisClix
C'mon people! Sieves for mud? Never heard of such silliness. You grade mud using a cyclosizer.

Quote
The Cyclosizer is a laboratory precision apparatus for the rapid and accurate determination of particle size distribution within the sub-sieve range.Particles are separated according to their Stokesian settling characteristics by a principle based on the well known hydraulic cyclone principle. The effective separating range is 50 to 8 microns for material of a specific gravity similar to quartz (SG 2.7), but the lower limit may extend down to 4 microns for particles of high specific gravity (for example - Galena with its SG of 7.5). Samples of up to 100 grams of minus 200 mesh or minus 325 mesh material may be separated into five fractions. The time required for an effective separation can range from 10 minutes to as long as 30 minutes. Extra time is required for dewatering and drying and weighing the separate fractions.The apparatus consists of five 3 inch diameter cyclones and ancillary equipment all mounted on a console cabinet with all necessary controls and gauges. The unit is shipped completely assembled and ready for use. It required as service items, single phase power, clean water at 9 to 14 liters per minute and a floor drainage point.

dave

  • Guest
Just spoke to Iain. He says the two things he did were further along from Who Wants To Be Lucky Pierre, up a slab on a ledge. One up the LH side with a tree at the top Boonapi E3/4 6c, one up the RH side Marramunt HVS 6a/6b. Said both would make good highballs.

Kim repeated this E3/4 of Farrar Monch's today thinking it was new - well you would wouldn't you, what with it being listed in the gudie specificaly as unclimbed. Anyway, it looked good. Heres a photo to stimulate interest. dunno what grade Kim thought but at one point he was saying if the crux was at the ground you'd be looking at font 6c (thought that might have been a touch glib), so taking the height into acount we're still not talking hero grades here, and it deserves traffic by the look of it. probably worth taking a rope to secure the spotters though.



Farrar's name is shit though. I'd have called it "Lawrence Of Her Labia".

 

SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2023, SimplePortal