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Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) (Read 24332 times)

ian dunn

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The real proof of whether the policy works is if Federations implement it. Will national federations stop their top climbers competing if they are in the red category? I suspect pressure from athletes, sponsors, funding organisations etc etc will be difficult for some countries. Its great that there is a policy and it should be attached as an appendix to the recent BMC GB Climbing policy on Climbers Health however it will need enforcing.

slab_happy

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If I'm reading that correctly, it's relying almost entirely on blood pressure and heartrate in addition to BMI for the initial screening -- there's also the "two questionnaires", but it's not specified whether they're assessing anything beyond "personal parameters for such criteria as height, weight, heart rate and blood pressure".

It's not something I know much about, but based on a quick Google, RED-S can result in low blood pressure and heartrate, but they're not a given, and it sounds like they may only occur in more severe cases; the IOC paper just calls them "potential indicators":

https://stillmed.olympics.com/media/Documents/Athletes/Medical-Scientific/Consensus-Statements/REDs/IOC-REDs-CAT2.pdf

But based on the flow chart, if your BMI is in the normal range heart rate and blood pressure aren't abnormally low, you won't be screened any further.

mattbirddog

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The real proof of whether the policy works is if Federations implement it. Will national federations stop their top climbers competing if they are in the red category? I suspect pressure from athletes, sponsors, funding organisations etc etc will be difficult for some countries. Its great that there is a policy and it should be attached as an appendix to the recent BMC GB Climbing policy on Climbers Health however it will need enforcing.

Hey Ian, just to chip in here from a commercial angle. I have never seen examples in my experience of a sponsor pressuring an athlete to compete, especially not around such a sensitive topic. I have examples of where sponsors have proactively sought help and support for athletes through injuries etc.

Where this situation could get sticky from a commercial basis is with the Olympic sponsors as a few of them have non-attendance clauses in the games (through injury or non-selection) which could come into play here BUT that is already set out in the contract. The only instance where this could get sticky is if that contract was signed before the new rules came into place as the athlete could argue the goal posts have changed.

National Federations and there home nation Olympic funding however... Discuss...

The biggest focus for me with this policy is ensuring the athlete(s) get the level of support to go through this process so there is a positive outcome at the end of any negative flags. I.e. they are ok, healthy and still have a positive relationship with climbing.

That is the next big step on from this first announcement hopefully.

 

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