UKBouldering.com

the shizzle => diet, training and injuries => Topic started by: shark on November 20, 2010, 08:17:10 pm

Title: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: shark on November 20, 2010, 08:17:10 pm
Below are links to the UK climbing performance coaches I am aware of, books that I recommend and articles on the web I found. The articles are listed and grouped by the authors I recognised followed by a Lucky Dip section. It is an updated version of something I did on UKC a few years ago. 

Let me know and I can add any other links to other useful articles/material/sites/coaches and we can post it up as an article on the front page for future reference and keep it up to date by linking new articles and taking out deadlinks.

UK Climbing coaches:

John Kettle (Lakes) www.johnkettle.com (http://www.johnkettle.com)
Simon Rawlinson and Paul Walters (South Wales) info@makethenextmove.co.uk  Coaching site (http://www.makethenextmove.co.uk)
Nik Jennings (Yorks/Lancs border I think) AKA nik at work  UKB Profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=41) nik_jennings@yahoo.co.uk  Coaching site (http://nikjennings.com)
Johnny Dawes dawesjohnny86@gmail.com
Mark McGowan (Scotland) markmcgowan01@gmail.com UKB profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=4748) Coaching site (http://reachclimbingcoach.blogspot.com/) 
Dylan Fletcher (Sheffield) Dylanfletcher@gmail.com AKA Dylan UKB profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=179)
Drew Haigh (North England) drew@chalk-bags.com AKA Drewski RootbitchUKB profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=2680)
Tom Randall (Sheffield)AKA Tommy UKB profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=1118)
Steve Golley (South England) info@climbingmasterclass.comAKa SteGUKB profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=3068)
Mark Reeves (N Wales) mark.reeves@mac.com
Robbie Phillips (Scotland) robz@robbiephillips.co.uk
Katherine Schirmacher (North England) katherine@lovetoclimb.co.uk
Steve McClure (North England) verticalglobe@hotmail.com
Ben Heason (North England) benheason@googlemail.com
Mark Pretty (North England) markzippypretty@hotmail.co.uk
Gareth Parry (North West) gazclimber@hotmail.com
Lucy Creamer (North England) lucy@lucycreamer.com
Neil Gresham (South England) info@climbingmasterclass.com
Tom Greenall (Sheffield) workforcepda@thearches.org.uk

Italian Climbing Coach !

Roberto Bagnoli (Firenze) info@climbingtraining.it AKA GuruUKB profile (http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=2636)


Recommended Books:

(US) Performance Climbing – the book that got the ball rolling
(US) Self Coached Climber – the successor to Performance Rock Climbing   
(UK) 9 out of 10 climbers make the same mistakes –Macleod’s ball buster - gold dust. Idiots will complain about lack of editing and pretty pictures. Ignore them 
(Sp) Planificacion del Entrenamiento en Escalada Deportiva by David Macia – No official translation. Impressive but hard to use to construct a training programme

Presentations from BMC Coaching Symposium 2011

 Competition Preparation by Ian Dunn (http://ukbouldering.com/media/pdf/competitionpreparation.pdf)
 Periodisation by Tom Randall (http://ukbouldering.com/media/pdf/periodisation.pdf)
 Principles of Training by Dave Binney (http://ukbouldering.com/media/pdf/principlestraining.pdf)

Articles on the web:

John Kettle (Coach)
Movement Inprovement (http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=4383)

Doug Hunter and Dan Hague (authors of Self Coached Climber) categorised blog site:
Physical training (http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/category/science-theory-of-training/
[url=http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/category/physical/)
Movement training (http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/category/movement/)
General (http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/category/general/)
Competition (http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/category/competition/)

Arran Deakin (Scone maker)
Principles of traing (http://www.theclimbingdepot.com/blogs/training/blog-1-the-principles-of-training)
Strength and power (http://www.theclimbingdepot.com/blogs/training/blog-2-strength-and-power)
How we get stronger (http://www.theclimbingdepot.com/blogs/training/blog-3-how-we-get-stronger)
Endurance Part1 (http://www.theclimbingdepot.com/blogs/training/blog-4-endurance-part-1)
Endurance Part2 (http://www.theclimbingdepot.com/blogs/training/blog-5-endurance-part-2)
[/quote]

Steve Bechtel (Coach)
Climb Strong (http://climbstrong.wordpress.com/category/articles/)

Pull-Ups Are A Waste of Time
Exercises
Strength Training for Rock Climbing, part one
Hangboard Training for Finger Strength - The Basics
3-Tier Plan
Less is More - One Reason Your Training Plan is Failing
Six Week Strength-Endurance Build

Adrian Berry (Coach)
Time to Train (http://www.thebmc.co.uk/Feature.asp\x?id=1724)
5 things you can do at the climbing wall to improve your outdoor leading (http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=373)

Eva Lopez (Fingerboard designer and researcher)

 Her blog on training (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.com/)
Series of fingerboard instructional videos (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.com.es/2013/04/some-finger-training-instructional.html?m=1)
Her research paper (payment required): The effects of two maximum grip strength training methods using the same effort duration and different edge depth on grip endurance in elite climbers (http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19346182.2012.716061)
Training Pinch Grip Strength for Climbing. Are dead hangs the right way to do it? (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/training-pinch-strength-for-climbing.html)
Series of articles on locking off:
Lock-off Strength Training (I). Does Static (lock-offs) Training have any Effect over Dynamic (pull-ups) Performance? (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.com.es/2012/06/lock-off-strength-training-i-does.html)
Lock-off training (II) Does our locking-off ability have any influence on our performance? Is it so important to train it? (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/lock-off-training-ii-does-our-locking.html)
Lock-off training (III) Do you really lock-off? (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.com.es/2012/09/lock-off-training-iii-do-you-really.html)
Lock-off Training in Sport Climbing (IV). A Review of several Methods and an Introduction to Explosive Lock-Offs (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/lock-off-training-in-sport-climbing-iv.html)

Dan Varian (Beastie boy #1) aka Carlisle Slapper
[http://www.beastmaker.co.uk/pages/training]General fingerboard advice[/url]

Ned Feehally (Beastie boy #2)
Video:Fingerboard Training – Beginner (http://www.planetfear.com/videos.view.php?id=113 #2)
Fingerboard Training – Advanced (http://www.planetfear.com/videos.view.php?id=114)
Stretching (http://www.beastmaker.co.uk/Stretching.pdf)
Fingerboard training plans (http://climbingworks.com/download/files/Articles/beastmaker_fingerboard_article.pdf)

Crusher Holds / Paul Robins

 A comprehensive guide to fingerboard traing (http://www.pdf-archive.com/2011/08/04/crusher-holds-handout-3-5mb/)

Heather Clark
Weight Management for Climbers (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Weight_Management_for_Climbers_168.html)
Nutrition for bouldering (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Nutrition_for_Bouldering_169.html)

Steve Bechtel / Climb Strong

Off-Season Build 1 (4 weeks)
Six Week Strength-Endurance Build
Strength Training for Rock Climbing, part one
Exercises
Forearm Hypertrophy Training
Strength Training for Rock Climbing, part two
About
Hangboard Training for Finger Strength - The Basics
Leg Strength as a Limiting Factor, Revisited
Call It What You Want, Periodized Training Works.
The Simplest Climbing Training Plan
Pull-Ups Are A Waste of Time (http://climbstrong.wordpress.com/category/articles/)

Neil Gresham
5 Things you can do to improve your bouldering (http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=374)

Neil Greshams Planetfear articles (http://www.planetfear.com/articles.archive.php?startnumber=660)

Self-coaching (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Self_Coaching_179.html)
Learning From Other Sports (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_To_Learning_From_Other_Sports_1082.html)
Mid season training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_To_MidSeason_Training_1067.html)
Building a home board (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Building_a_Home_Board_173.html)
Foot off boards (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_FootOff_Boards_174.html)
Warming Up (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Warming_Up__175.html)
Training Juniors 1 (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Training_Juniors_1_176.html)
 Training Juniors 2 (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Training_Juniors_2_177.html)
 Working Weaknesses (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Working_Weaknesses_178.html)
Arm Movements (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Arm_Movements_185.html)
 Isolation Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Isolation_Training_202.html)
Weight Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Weight_Training_203.html)
System Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_System_Training_204.html)
Bouldering for Strength (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Bouldering_for_Strength_205.html)
 Advanced Bouldering Exercises (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Advanced_Bouldering_Exercises_206.html)
 Campus Boarding (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Campus_Boarding_207.html)
Finger Boarding (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Finger_Boarding_208.html)
Finger Strength Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Finger_Strength_Training_209.html)
SACC Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_SACC_Training_210.html)
Interval Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Interval_Training_211.html)
Endurance Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Endurance_Training_212.html)
Competition Training (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_Guide_to_Competition_Training_213.html)
Mid-Season Top-Up (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Neil_Greshams_MidSeason_TopUp_216.html)

Articles by Eric Horst (Author of Training for Climbing ) (http://www.trainingforclimbing.com/new/articles.shtml)
Training in Accordance to the "SAID" Principle
Three Cornerstone Principles of Effective Training
An Overview of Power & Strength Training
How To Increase "Pull Strength" by 20 Percent!
Is Climbing the Best Training for Climbing
High-Value Training: Working the Antagonists
Bouldering as Training for Climbing
Hypergravity Isolation Training for Max Grip Strength
HIT Workout Details for Maximum Grip Strength
Sport-Specific Training with Pump Rocks - Part 1
Sport-Specific Training with Pump Rocks - Part 2
Effective Fingerboard Training - Part 1
Training the Core Muscles
Eastern Bloc Training: Heavy Finger Rolls
Training at the Crags
Effective Pull-up Training
Developing "Limit" Strength
Low-Risk Campus Training for Power & Grip Strength - Part 1
Campus Training for Strength & Power - Part 2
Best of "Pump Rock" Training
Training Muscular Endurance - Part 1
Training Muscular Endurance - Part 2
Complex Training
The Benefits of Pilates for Climbers
Physioball Exercises for Your Core
Research: The Physiology of Difficult Rock Climbing
Pilates Training for Climbers

Prof Juan Martín Miranda (Marvin) (http://www.marvinclimbing.com/english/index.php)
Training: Boulder or routes?
Core Training
Campus board training
The training load in sport climbing
Strength training for climbing: The system training method
Contact strength Part 1 and 2
Programming and organisation of training
How much last a boulder session?
Maximum climbing performance. A matter of head
Interbloque: special boulder training
Creatine supplementation
Restoring the work capacity after a climbing session
Strength training methods for elite climbers
How to accelerate recovery?
Stiffened forearms in climbing
From athletics methodology to climbing. Fartlek method.
Training for climbing competitions
Speed Climbing Traing Part 1,2 and 3
Training for climbing. Is really necessary?
Nutritional aspects to optimize climbing training and performance
A wrong way of life
Adding extra weight to your climbing training session
Bad luck for campus

Dave MacLeod
Dave regularly posts on his training blog (http://www.onlineclimbingcoach.blogspot.com/)

He has sub-divided the blogs into the following searchable categories including: Planning your training (27) Physical Training (25) Perspective (21) Practical (20) Injuries (19) Tactics (16) Web Resources (15) Inspiration (13) Pro-tips (12) Reviews (12) Technique Drills (11) Coaching (10) Young climbers (7) Beginners (5) Interviews (5) New research (5) overtraining (5) Body composition (4) basic technique (4) mental training (4) rock shoes (4) strength (4) periodisation (3) endurance training (2) fingerboarding (2) rest (2) Female climbers (1) Rock 'til you drop (1) finger pullies (1) nutrition (1) weight (1)

He has also written six ‘coachwise’ articles here (http://www.mcofs.org.uk/coachwise.asp)
Introduction to the CoachWise Articles
How to get the best from these coaching articles
Part 1: Don't Stray Off-Route
The 'Big Three Factors' of movement, finger strength and body mass.
Part 2: The Work is the Easy Part...
Preventing everyday life sapping your motivation to train whether your'e starting from scratch or have reached a plateau.
Part 3: Creatures of Habit
Ingrained habits that are holding you back
 Part 4: Fail well, climb it next time
The fear of failure and turning failure to your advantage
Part 5: Choose Your Heroes and your Coaches Carefully
Dave's advice on who to look to for the best advice - great coaches or great climbers?
Part 6: Count Your Battle Scars
Climbing walls have been a godsend for modern training, but you have to go back to climbing outdoors to become 'Battle Hardened' 

His undergraduate paper is
here (Physiological determinants of climbing-specific finger endurance and sport rock climbing performance) (http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a780819397~db=all~order=page) 

 Ben Moon’s site (http://www.moonclimbing.com/SchoolRoom.aspx)
10 Ways to revamp your climbing
Principles of planning your climbing year
The 3 training phases for climbing
Using a training diary
Endurance Training
Core body – the missing link
Introduction to Training
Training Questionnaire
Training and Goal Setting
Power Training
Training Plan
Warming Up
Warming Down
Flexibility and Stretching Intro
Stretches Lower Body
Stretches Upper Body
Campus Boarding
Fingerboard
Fingerboard Training Plan
Bouldering Training
Systems Training
Systems Training Plan

Audry Morrison (Scientist)
Review of the physiological responses to rock climbing in young climbers – abstract of paper (http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/bjsm.2006.034827v1?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&R...)

Marius Morstad OTE articles
Training Endurance (http://stonemonkey.dk/artikler/marius_morstad_ote/training_endurance_part1.pdf)
Training Strength (http://stonemonkey.dk/artikler/marius_morstad_ote/training_strength_part2.pdf)

Lucky Dip

http://www.8a.nu/site2/ (http://www.8a.nu/site2/)  Click>articles Click>training:
Steve McClure Training – engrams
Training 40+
Five common gripping positions
Technical Endurance advice
Hangboarding
Training and performance in Slovenia
Stativ vs Dynamic technique
Pump and how to avoid it
DYNOING - A ballastic science: Fly, baby fly?
Lactic Acid and Pumped Forearms
Power Endurance - McClure
Specific finger position training
Recruitment finger training
Static/Dynamic - Muscle/Hold focus
Lactid Acid
Shortcuts to 8a

rockclimbing.com
The making of a Rock Prodigy (Classic !) (http://www.rockclimbing.com/Articles/Training_and_Technique/The_Making_of_a_Rockprodigy__258.html)
Finger & Back/Arm Strength]Finger, Back and Arm Strength (http://www.rockclimbing.com/Articles/Training_and_Technique/Finger_Back_Arm_Strength_18.html)
Evaluating and choosing training activities by Doug Hunter co-author of the Self Coached Climber (http://www.rockclimbing.com/Articles/Training_and_Technique/Some_Questions_for_Evaluating_and_Choosing_Training_Activities_150.html)

http://www.climbandmore.com/climbing,0,4,0,training.html (http://www.climbandmore.com/climbing,0,4,0,training.html)
Theraband - Training the Opposing Muscles
Josune Bereziartu on Training
John Gill on Training
Listen to the Master series: Ben Moon/Lynn Hill/Francois Legrand/Josune Bereziartu/Jerry Moffat/Malcolm Smith

http://www.mikedoyle.ca/climbing/coachingdoc.pdf (http://www.mikedoyle.ca/climbing/coachingdoc.pdf)
pdf download: Training Manual for Competition Climbing

http://www.bodyresults.com/S1Climb.asp (http://www.bodyresults.com/S1Climb.asp)
Program Development
Unilateral and Bilateral Climbing Exercises
Stretching, Injury Prevention and Rehab
Climbing Drills
Outdoor Sports Conditioning
General Strength Training Guidelines
Increase Your Pullups

www.abc-of-rockclimbing.com/training/ (http://www.abc-of-rockclimbing.com/training/)
Strength
Burst or Explosive Power
Endurance
Strength and Endurance
Aerobic Capacity
Counting Food Carbohydrates
Hand exercises and grip strength training

http://www.metoliusclimbing.com/how-to-guides.html (http://www.metoliusclimbing.com/how-to-guides.html)
Training Guide
10 Minute Training Sequence
Training with Simulator
Training with Pure Force
Training with Rock Rings

http://www.jollypower.com/jollyhomeI.htm (http://www.jollypower.com/jollyhomeI.htm) (Italian site)
Power
Strength
Endurance
Technique and flow
Intensity
Recovery
Dynos
Plyometric training

http://www.climbingwalls.net/training.html (http://www.climbingwalls.net/training.html)
Power & Power Endurance, Strength Training and Endurance Training

http://www.climbing.com.au/science_climbing.htm (http://www.climbing.com.au/science_climbing.htm)
Collection of science articles
http://www.indoorclimbing.com/training.html (http://www.indoorclimbing.com/training.html)
Chin Ups
Climbing Exercises
Climbing Games
Climbing Technique
Forearm Exercise
How Muscles Work
Mental Control
Muscle Stretching
Overtraining
Route Setting
Training Plans
Training Principles
Carbohydrates
Carbohydrate Loading
Daily Protein Requirement
Food Fats
Protein Foods

 Huw George (Who he?) on core stability (Planetfear) (http://www.planetfear.com/articles/Core_Stability__an_introduction_825.html)
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on November 20, 2010, 09:35:21 pm
More stuff for the cunning linguists:

Recommended Books:

(De) Lizenz zum Klettern by Udo Neumann – effectively the third edition of Performance Rock Climbing
(De) Lizenz zum Bouldern by Udo Neumann - haven't read it yet.

Articles on the web:

Udo Neumann's website (http://www.udini.de/): piles of worthwhile training articles in German, some interesting videos where one doesn't necessarily have to understand what's being said, e.g. this one (http://www.udini.de/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=197:besser-bouldern-workshop&catid=51:besserklettern&Itemid=139).

And a few colonial coaching blogs I've looked at lately (where foreign language skills aren't quite so critical)

Australian coach and kneepad merchant Lee Cujes has a blog (http://upskillclimbing.blogspot.com/) and some other articles (http://www.qurank.com/upskillclimbing/services.html).
Power Company Climbing (http://www.powercompanyclimbing.com/)
Climb Strong (http://climbstrong.wordpress.com/category/articles/)
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on November 21, 2010, 10:13:40 am
Mark MacGowan has a training blog (http://markmcgowan01.blogspot.com/) and a coaching blog (http://reachclimbingcoach.blogspot.com/)
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: SpanishJuan on November 21, 2010, 01:23:38 pm
 A mathematical theory of climbing (http://imamat.oxfordjournals.org/content/72/5/570.abstract)
I liked  the opening of the abstract "Is it possible to develop a theory of climbing? The answer is no." Piero Villaggio
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Serpico on November 21, 2010, 02:21:41 pm
Some strength and conditioning links:
http://www.exrx.net/ (http://www.exrx.net/)
http://www.brianmac.co.uk/ (http://www.brianmac.co.uk/)
http://www.pponline.co.uk/ (http://www.pponline.co.uk/)
http://www.nsca-lift.org/webnews/archnews.asp (http://www.nsca-lift.org/webnews/archnews.asp)
http://www.athletikspesifik.com/ (http://www.athletikspesifik.com/)
http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/ (http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/)
http://gubernatrix.co.uk/ (http://gubernatrix.co.uk/)
http://www.fitstep.com/Library/Exercises/Exercises.htm (http://www.fitstep.com/Library/Exercises/Exercises.htm)
http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/articles.html (http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/articles.html)
http://www.staleytraining.com/ (http://www.staleytraining.com/)
http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Home/tabid/83/Default.aspx (http://www.verkhoshansky.com/Home/tabid/83/Default.aspx)
http://www.coachesinfo.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=68&Itemid=140 (http://www.coachesinfo.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=68&Itemid=140)


Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: erm, sam on November 22, 2010, 07:23:55 pm
Good idea!

The 2nd of the rockclimbing.com links doesn't appear to work though..
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Wipey Why on November 22, 2010, 09:00:22 pm
http://www.nicros.com/training.cfm (http://www.nicros.com/training.cfm)

Lots of training goodness here
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: shark on November 22, 2010, 09:23:00 pm
http://www.nicros.com/training.cfm (http://www.nicros.com/training.cfm)
Lots of training goodness here

 :-\

This is Horst's commercial site. I think the links I have made above to his less commercial site more than fairly represents his output. If you aren't aware Horst has attracted a lot of criticism for proposing many things as fact that dont stand up to serious scrutiny. He is a good salesman but the jury is out on much of his SCIENCE.   

Thanks for the suggestions so far. Keep them coming.
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Falling Down on November 23, 2010, 10:35:51 pm
Some pieces from the public Gym Jones website that are appropriate.  Yes, Gym Jones is a commercial venture and focused on strength and conditioning as opposed to climbing/sport specific training but there is a lot of very good material available.

Some things worth pondering when it comes to training.

1   The mind is primary
2   Outcome-based training (train for an objective)
3      Functional training (high degree of transferability)
4      Movements not muscles (transferable training does not isolate muscles)
5      Power-to-weight ratio (you must carry the engine)
6      Train all energy systems (emphasize the important but not at the expense of others)
7      Training is preparation for the real thing (train FOR something)
8      The mind is primary II (confidence, chemicals, carriage)
9      Nutrition is the foundation (eat for an objective)
10    Recovery is more than 50% of the proces

Some articles worth chewing over....

Hard Work http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=37 (http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=37)

Why fitness is important http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=5
 (http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=5)

Remake Remodel http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=40 (http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=40) note: this is not about training oneself into injury territory

Quality (or doing shit properly) http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=20 (http://www.gymjones.com/knowledge.php?id=20)

There's more at http://www.gymjones.com/ (http://www.gymjones.com/)

Enjoy



Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: curly ben on November 28, 2010, 04:25:02 pm
does anyone have the OTE/climb ? Steve Mcclure training articles/series from a few years back. Remember a good one on 'recruitment'/warm up.... also would be interested in the power endurance article if anyone has it.
Thanks
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: curly ben on November 30, 2010, 10:59:01 am
...and does anyone have anything on 'tabathatas' remember reading something on it with regards to campussing/fingerboarding by Mark Pretty/Gresham in climb a while back thought it sounded pretty interesting
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on November 30, 2010, 11:13:11 am
This information sounds/reads like a prime candidate for UKB Wiki material.  I started a template ages ago (see Training : The Science (http://www.ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Training_:_The_Science), but since I do very little structured training had very little to include at the time.

Most of this would likely fit under "Links" section, but where a break-down of each site has been given it might be appropriate to have the summary included.  Either way its there for people to use.

(I'm afraid I'm too busy to spend time re-formatting and wiki-fying other peoples efforts)
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: account_inactive on November 30, 2010, 11:54:39 am
...and does anyone have anything on 'tabathatas' remember reading something on it with regards to campussing/fingerboarding by Mark Pretty/Gresham in climb a while back thought it sounded pretty interesting

FYI
Quote
The Tabata Protocol--named after Izumi Tabata, Ph.D., a former researcher at Japan's National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya--is an interval routine developed by the head coach of the Japanese speed-skating team. (It's called a protocol because Tabata and his team took the speed-skating coach's workout and studied it to quantify just how effective it really was.) The workout consists of six to seven 20-second full-speed sprints interspersed with rest periods of 10 seconds.

In Tabata's study, the researchers found that guys who used the routine five days a week for six weeks improved their maximum aerobic capacity (a measure of your body's ability to consume oxygen--the more oxygen you can take in, the longer and harder you'll be able to run) by 14%. What's more, it also improved anaerobic capacity (which measures your speed endurance, or the duration you're able to sprint at full effort) by 28%. So the Tabata Protocol is the rare workout that benefits both endurance athletes and sprinters--hard to accomplish. Consider: A study of traditional aerobic training--running at 70% of aerobic capacity for 60 minutes--for the same number of weeks showed an improvement in aerobic capacity of 9.5% and no effect on anaerobic capacity.

The key to the Tabata Protocol's effectiveness appears to be the short rest intervals between sprints. Conventional interval-training guidelines suggest keeping a 1:3 work-rest ratio. That is, your rest periods should last three times as long as the duration of your sprints. But the Tabata Protocol's work-rest ratio is 2:1, which means your rest periods are only half as long as the time you're working. And according to another Tabata study, that formula isn't just more effective than traditional aerobic training, it's also more effective than typical interval training. In that other study, Tabata and his colleagues compared their original protocol to a second configuration of intervals that consisted of 30-second sprints interspersed with two-minute rest periods. Despite the fact that this required subjects to sprint for more time at a higher intensity, the original Tabata Protocol still proved more effective at boosting both aerobic and anaerobic capacity.
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: rich d on November 30, 2010, 01:37:41 pm
With a 2:1 rest period would this correlate to something like repeaters with 7 seconds on 3 seconds off.or is the rest after each set that'd be more relevant? So you'd say that six lots of 7 on 3 off, would be a minute - then you'd have a 30 second rest before starting off again?
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Falling Down on November 30, 2010, 01:43:32 pm
Also good to mix the fingerboard with a weight/lift movement as one of the exercises.  Some good suggestions from Dan John here: http://danjohn.net/2009/11/tabata-exercises/ (http://danjohn.net/2009/11/tabata-exercises/)
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jwi on December 03, 2010, 12:28:38 pm
More stuff for the cunning linguists:

Recommended Books:

(De) Lizenz zum Klettern by Udo Neumann – effectively the third edition of Performance Rock Climbing
(De) Lizenz zum Bouldern by Udo Neumann - haven't read it yet.

Articles on the web:

Udo Neumann's website (http://www.udini.de/): piles of worthwhile training articles in German, some interesting videos where one doesn't necessarily have to understand what's being said, e.g. this one (http://www.udini.de/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=197:besser-bouldern-workshop&catid=51:besserklettern&Itemid=139).

I have skimmed through Lizenz zum Klettern (and unfortunately my german is not that hot) but there seems to be little new since 'Performance Rock Climbing'.  I think that for us that understand english better than german, PRC suffices.

One book in german that I really rate is the short training manual from Gudio Köstermeyer, Peak Perfomance (http://www.amazon.de/Peak-Performance-Guido-Köstermeyer/dp/3930650525/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291378503&sr=8-1).  I think it is amusing that most books about training for climbing contains a short introduction to elementary sports physiology (and often more about the physiology of running ...), but this book---by one of the few authors in the field truly qualified to write about sport physiology---contains no such chapter.

Köstermeyer also have a webpage that is seldom updated http://klettertraining.de/ (http://klettertraining.de/)
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Turboman on December 03, 2010, 12:41:51 pm
Found in a book shop in Chamonix.

http://www.ed-amphora.fr/fr/products/detail/id/2371.html (http://www.ed-amphora.fr/fr/products/detail/id/2371.html)

Seems like it was written with input from Liv Sansoz, Alexandre Chabot, Pierre Bollinger and Jérôme Meyer.  Unfortunately it was a bit beyond my GCSE French.   Looked to have some interesting stuff in it though.

Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on December 03, 2010, 07:16:58 pm
I have skimmed through Lizenz zum Klettern (and unfortunately my german is not that hot) but there seems to be little new since 'Performance Rock Climbing'.

I'm inclined to agree, from my vague recollection of having read PRC a long time ago. I don't have my copy of PRC any more though (having not climbed for most of the intervening years) so reading most of it again - with some updates - can't do any harm. I'll check out Köstermeyer though.

Another one I've been enjoying is this thread on ARC training on rockclimbing.com (http://www.rockclimbing.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?topic=48499&forum=36) from a few years ago. It even features Serpico (http://www.rockclimbing.com/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=1077339#1077339):
Quote
endurance is seen by most climbers as being solely a physiological attribute. Whereas IMO it's as much a skill as anything else eg: learning what pace to climb at on different terrain, how to tolerate lactic acid, how to use the minimum force to hold on, and how and when to try to recover on marginal rests.
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: mrjonathanr on December 04, 2010, 07:47:01 pm
Seems like it was written with input from Liv Sansoz, Alexandre Chabot, Pierre Bollinger and Jérôme Meyer.

The resume says it includes concrete accounts from those climbers about the effectiveness of particular techniques in the book. So I guess that means they're saying 'this works, I did X and Y resulted..'
Title: Re: Training resources (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Rabies on December 14, 2010, 04:48:13 pm
Seems like it was written with input from Liv Sansoz, Alexandre Chabot, Pierre Bollinger and Jérôme Meyer.

The resume says it includes concrete accounts from those climbers about the effectiveness of particular techniques in the book. So I guess that means they're saying 'this works, I did X and Y resulted..'

Excellent case study in this book written by Alex Chabot entitled "How cake affected my performance in Fontainebleau".  Discusses the problems of consuming too much cake whilst at Fontainebleau and what you can do to overcome this problem.  Includes some great examples of how cake can be used to improve your performance such as placing pastries on top outs and in pockets.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on August 07, 2011, 05:51:14 pm
Did anything ever happen about putting all this stuff on the wiki?

Anyway, found these a couple of weeks ago: in German, from the website of the Tivoli wall in Innsbruck, suggested training programmes for beginners (http://www.kletterzentrum-tivoli.at/?menu=35&getPage=div/Anf%E4nger.html&menu=36), serious amateurs (http://www.kletterzentrum-tivoli.at/?menu=35&getPage=div/standard.html&menu=37) and Austrian team members (http://www.kletterzentrum-tivoli.at/?menu=35&getPage=div/profi.html&menu=38) by Austrian team coach Reini Scherer.

Turns out I am just about approaching "Beginner" level according to Reini. My consistent onsight/second go level is about 6a+, so he says I should be working projects at 6c. I've been on a couple of 6b+'s: basically I don't redpoint, with very few exceptions I only go on things I think I have a realistic chance of onsighting. Must try harder.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: cjsheps on September 05, 2011, 10:40:22 am
Simon Rawlinson and Paul Walters (South Wales coaches): www.makethenextmove.co.uk (http://www.makethenextmove.co.uk)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: highrepute on October 14, 2011, 11:15:20 pm
Found these 4 articles by Robbie that I thought were very good:
Part 1 Climbing to Get Better: What is Training? (http://www.mcofs.org.uk/assets/getactive/robbies%20beast%20building%201.pdf)
Part 2 Training for Endurance (http://www.mcofs.org.uk/assets/getactive/robbies_beast_building_2.pdf)
Part 3 Strength and Power (http://www.mcofs.org.uk/assets/getactive/robbies%20beasting%203.pdf)
Part 4 That's Pure Mental Man! (http://www.mcofs.org.uk/assets/getactive/robbies%20beastings%204%20mental%20v2.pdf)

on this website www.mcofs.org.uk (http://www.mcofs.org.uk/beastbuildingseries.asp)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on January 26, 2012, 08:37:25 pm
Quote
Improvements, as we all know, sometimes determine success in climbing.

Thank you google translate.

Eva López (http://eva-lopez.blogspot.com/) has what looks like it would be a detailed and well researched article on fingerboarding (http://eva-lopez.blogspot.com/2012/01/entrenamiento-de-suspensiones-en-cantos.html) for somebody who could read Spanish.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jwi on January 27, 2012, 11:02:58 am
Quote
Improvements, as we all know, sometimes determine success in climbing.

Thank you google translate.

Eva López (http://eva-lopez.blogspot.com/) has what looks like it would be a detailed and well researched article on fingerboarding (http://eva-lopez.blogspot.com/2012/01/entrenamiento-de-suspensiones-en-cantos.html) for somebody who could read Spanish.

The instructions for the fingerboard she's selling (a bunch of different with edges) has been translated to german and english (I think).  López has done a study on different programs for increasing fingerstrength. I think the study can be found in her thesis.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: erm, sam on January 27, 2012, 11:08:28 am
http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/ (http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/)

Lots of interesting posts about training..
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: shark on January 27, 2012, 12:17:20 pm
http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/ (http://www.selfcoachedclimber.com/)

Lots of interesting posts about training..

Good find !

I'll add it to the original post
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: robertostallioni on January 29, 2012, 07:01:26 pm
I do want to get trained and very willing to pay. How much would it cost for me to get a good trainer?

(http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00024/F_200703_March09ed_i_24129a.jpg)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: shark on January 29, 2012, 07:03:28 pm
As much as that  :o
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: robertostallioni on January 29, 2012, 07:04:38 pm
You ruined that for me. I was in there.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: shark on January 29, 2012, 07:20:20 pm
You ruined that for me. I was in there.

Soz. I didn't realise Nigerian spammers were your type
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Paul B on January 30, 2012, 01:14:00 am
Struggling on the beastmaker slopers? Look no further...

Beastmaker - The Dreaded 45°s (http://vimeo.com/35829837)

http://www.upskillclimbing.com/2012/01/mere-mortals-guide-to-beasting.html (http://www.upskillclimbing.com/2012/01/mere-mortals-guide-to-beasting.html)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on February 15, 2012, 12:16:07 pm
Eva López (http://eva-lopez.blogspot.com/) has what looks like it would be a detailed and well researched article on fingerboarding (http://eva-lopez.blogspot.com/2012/01/entrenamiento-de-suspensiones-en-cantos.html) for somebody who could read Spanish.

... and now also for people who can read English (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.com/2012/02/why-progression.html)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: dk on June 04, 2012, 10:18:17 pm
http://www.mikedoyle.ca/climbing/coachingdoc.pdf (http://www.mikedoyle.ca/climbing/coachingdoc.pdf)

I don't think this has already been mentioned but it one of the better articles I've found.

Also what are people's ideas on training stamina? Is it better to do loads of mileage without getting so pumped you fall off, or climb till pump makes you fall of quickly shake out and carry on up on easier ground maintaining the pump?

I read that lactic acid actually breaks down your muscles so it isn't a good idea to get really pumped to often as this will cause dramatic reductions in strenght?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: shark on June 04, 2012, 10:43:06 pm
Hi dk

The article has been on the web for several years but IMO doesn't think it added anything new.

The physiology of chemical reactions is pretty complicated but suffice to say that lactic acid doesnt break down your muscles although there is a trade-off between strength and endurance training. If you read up on the Dave Binney and Tom Randall articles linked that can give you a good working structure in understanding the different energy sytems and how to train them.

HTH
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: dk on June 04, 2012, 11:25:10 pm
Thanks, I wasn't sure about how true it was that Lactic acid would break down your muscles. ill give those articles a read tomorow  :)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on August 10, 2012, 12:42:56 pm
A comparative study of Upper Body Performance Factors in sport climbers and boulderers. From Eva Lopez's latest entry bibliography. 118 pages...
http://gradworks.umi.com/1481622.pdf (http://gradworks.umi.com/1481622.pdf)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Stubbs on August 10, 2012, 12:59:37 pm
A comparative study of Upper Body Performance Factors in sport climbers and boulderers. From Eva Lopez's latest entry bibliography. 118 pages...
http://gradworks.umi.com/1481622.pdf (http://gradworks.umi.com/1481622.pdf)

Quote
No significant anthropometric and UBPC differences
were found between male sport climbers and boulderers. Female boulderers had
significantly greater handgrip and pinchgrip strength than female sport climbers (p <
0.05). Maximal campusboard reach was significantly related to climbing skill level for
all groups (p < 0.05). Therefore, grip strength may be more important for female boulderers than female sport climbers, and campusboard training may improve one's
climbing ability.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Paul B on August 10, 2012, 01:09:34 pm
Quote
Push-up endurance was employed in this study to quantify muscular endurance
among the participants, no distinction was found between the sexes, as well as between
the sport climbers and boulderers. The results also indicate that there was no significant
relationship between push-up endurance and climbing skill level.

 :o Call Sherlock, quick!
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on August 10, 2012, 02:32:04 pm
Just went through the pages while on the bus. Is it useless?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on August 17, 2012, 02:43:33 pm
I found this interesting, although mainly addressed to the lower body. Bodyweight excercises with a few routines.
https://usagym.org/pages/home/publications/technique/2009/01/16_bodyweight.pdf (https://usagym.org/pages/home/publications/technique/2009/01/16_bodyweight.pdf)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on August 21, 2012, 03:09:10 pm
Still on T-nation, a site with a lot of useful information, and the only site I've ever found in which they make clear the difference between being big and being strong.
A nice article about training power in commercial gyms.
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/commercial_gym_power (http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/commercial_gym_power)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Big Dave on August 21, 2012, 05:16:24 pm
There are some excellent articles and information on the t-nation site/blog. However, they do like to advertise some of their products in the articles sometimes which is a bit annoying, but I just ignore that.

Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: thekettle on September 30, 2012, 06:01:21 pm
Steve Betchel of Climbstrong has recenty published a rather good mini-book on interval training for power endurance:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climb-Strong-Endurance-Steve-Bechtel/dp/1470046156/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1348341994&sr=8-1-fkmr0 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climb-Strong-Endurance-Steve-Bechtel/dp/1470046156/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1348341994&sr=8-1-fkmr0)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on December 12, 2012, 07:05:48 am
This could easily pi** off many ones, but I think it's interesting.
Opinions? Science?
http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/conditioning_is_a_sham (http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/conditioning_is_a_sham)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on December 12, 2012, 08:30:55 am
Quote
loading 200 bales of hay is only an endurance task to a guy that's strong enough to actually perform the work

What's that Tony Yaniro quote? Something like "if you can't do the moves, there is nothing to endure"
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: sebpoch on April 12, 2013, 12:29:42 pm
very useful list with some of very good links  :goodidea:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: krymson on May 30, 2013, 11:32:06 am
I thought this was a good interview with advice along the lines of Dave's 9 out of 10.
http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=68093&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter (http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=68093&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter)

I guess the interview is notable in that it is not about training performance at all, but a more gestalt view - that there is more to athlete development than the pure development of performance, and that it is important to recognize the importance and impact of things like  --the  "human relationship"(your social environment), your motivations, and balancing hard training with the oft neglected injury prevention.

There is some more details in this other interview (http://www.8a.nu/?IncPage=http%3A//www.8a.nu/articles/ShowArticle.aspx%3FArticleId%3D8608) as well.

If you're looking for specific performance advice this isn't it, but for thoughts about long term development i think it's good.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: mrjonathanr on May 30, 2013, 10:26:51 pm
Quote
loading 200 bales of hay is only an endurance task to a guy that's strong enough to actually perform the work

What's that Tony Yaniro quote? Something like "if you can't do the moves, there is nothing to endure"

Here's a Yaniro quote:
" Never, ever pass up an opportunity to get pumped. "

Maybe route climbers should train the lot...
8a+ in 1979...
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: krymson on August 21, 2013, 05:07:18 am
http://scoobysworkshop.com/ (http://scoobysworkshop.com/)

Really solid advice about lifting and working out in general from a guy who knows what he's on about, taught in an approachable way.

Besides a good understanding of whats important and not, he really goes into depth about how to  properly do exercises. For example, he doesn't just coach you on shouder raises, but on how you should concentrate on the pinky and lift slowly. He doesn't just teach you the motion of a dumbbell press but explains the importance of keeping your shoulders packed while doing the press.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: krymson on September 30, 2013, 02:40:43 pm
http://www.climbingmasterclass.com/training/protips.asp?article=2 (http://www.climbingmasterclass.com/training/protips.asp?article=2)

An older and more mature Malc on training for bouldering

And more on the main pro tips page: http://www.climbingmasterclass.com/training/protips.asp (http://www.climbingmasterclass.com/training/protips.asp)
Title: Steve House: Training for the New Alpinism
Post by: Muenchener on October 31, 2013, 08:15:55 am
Amazon page already up for Steve Houses's training book (http://www.amazon.com/Training-New-Alpinism-Climber-Athlete/dp/193834023X).

Not much to do with bouldering I know, nor can I imagine why the book won't be released until March when review copies apparently already exist (http://coldthistle.blogspot.com/2013/10/steve-houses-new-book-new-alpinism-with.html). That isn't going to help anybody's pre-monsoon season..
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: SA Chris on December 04, 2013, 08:12:17 am
http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Useful_Injury_and_Training_Articles (http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Useful_Injury_and_Training_Articles)

I've edited the wiki so if anyone finds any especially useful stuff it can go in there now.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on December 04, 2013, 10:07:10 am
http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Useful_Injury_and_Training_Articles (http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Useful_Injury_and_Training_Articles)

I've edited the wiki so if anyone finds any especially useful stuff it can go in there now.

There are already training and injury pages linked from the Bouldering FAQ (http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Bouldering_FAQ) section.

Just started moving the link you included around and Julian Sanders pages are already linked from the Elbow page, I've now included it on the Shoulder and Pulley pages.

I spent some time reformatting what GCW wrote on pulleys a while ago, if you want to re-write the three separate injury pages into one coherent one that would be useful. 
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: krymson on February 03, 2014, 05:50:54 am
A nice rundown of training apparatus including analysis of fingerboards, different types of campus boards, pinch trainers, dumbbells, and more obscure pieces like swivelbars, rings, and so on. Good read!

http://www.restjug.com/2013/12/the-ideal-gym-part-1-upper-body-conditioning (http://www.restjug.com/2013/12/the-ideal-gym-part-1-upper-body-conditioning)


Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on February 03, 2014, 08:00:25 am
A nice rundown of training apparatus including analysis of fingerboards, different types of campus boards, pinch trainers, dumbbells, and more obscure pieces like swivelbars, rings, and so on. Good read!

http://www.restjug.com/2013/12/the-ideal-gym-part-1-upper-body-conditioning (http://www.restjug.com/2013/12/the-ideal-gym-part-1-upper-body-conditioning)

Added to the Wiki (http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Training_:_The_Science#General)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on February 17, 2014, 04:19:07 pm
I just looked at the table of contents of Steve House's new book Training For The New Alpinism (http://www.mytabletbooks.com/BookDetails.aspx?prdid=222)

I know it's somewhat off-topic for us here, and the idea that there might be any threat of me engaging in "The New Alpinism" is to laugh, but just look at some of the people interviewed/quoted: Tony Yaniro. Peter Habeler. Vojtek Kurtyka. Will Gadd. Barry Blanchard. Ines Papert. Colin Haley ... a complete Who's Who of Gnarliness. I am totally buying this book.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on March 17, 2014, 02:43:18 pm
http://www.t-nation.com/training/negatives-youre-doing-them-wrong (http://www.t-nation.com/training/negatives-youre-doing-them-wrong)
An interesting article about negatives.
I finally understand why they never worked for me en route to one armers. I was doing them wrong.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: erm, sam on March 17, 2014, 03:37:31 pm
http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/slow-and-eccentric-strength-training.html (http://en-eva-lopez.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/slow-and-eccentric-strength-training.html)

She says that unless your negatives are done with more weight than your er, positives you are wasting your time. I think.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on March 17, 2014, 03:42:40 pm
I have not read the Lopez's one, but if she says so, she agrees with the one I linked.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on April 03, 2014, 11:10:56 am
I just looked at the table of contents of Steve House's new book Training For The New Alpinism (http://www.mytabletbooks.com/BookDetails.aspx?prdid=222)

I know it's somewhat off-topic for us here, and the idea that there might be any threat of me engaging in "The New Alpinism" is to laugh, but just look at some of the people interviewed/quoted: Tony Yaniro. Peter Habeler. Vojtek Kurtyka. Will Gadd. Barry Blanchard. Ines Papert. Colin Haley ... a complete Who's Who of Gnarliness. I am totally buying this book.

Free worldwide shipping and just under 25% of the RRP from an alternative to Amazon (http://www.bookdepository.com/Training-for-New-Alpinism-Steve-House/9781938340239).

Review here (http://www.coolhunting.com/travel/training-for-the-new-alpinism.php) praises the sections on mental approaches and nutrition which will be of use to those with no interest in Alpinism.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on April 03, 2014, 12:07:57 pm
My emerging plans for the summer don't involve any high altitude or (intentional) snow & ice, but they do involve being able to keep going for 25 pitches not that far below my top onsight grade without needing a lie down. Ideally also finishing before it gets dark. So I will be paying some attention to the "how to keep going reasonably quickly for hours at a time" chapters.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: duncan on April 03, 2014, 12:25:20 pm
I'll be getting it. Unfortunately it's two months rather than two years before putting everything into action but I'll clutch any straw in a storm.

The Book Depository now owned by the tax avoiders (http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/oct/27/amazon-takeover-book-depository-oft).

This site (http://www.find-book.co.uk/) is sometimes useful, though not in this case.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on April 03, 2014, 01:05:02 pm

I'll be getting it. Unfortunately it's two months rather than two years before putting everything into action but I'll clutch any straw in a storm.

The Book Depository now owned by the tax avoiders (http://www.theguardian.com/books/2011/oct/27/amazon-takeover-book-depository-oft).

Hadn't realised that, thanks.

This site (http://www.find-book.co.uk/) is sometimes useful, though not in this case.

 :offtopic: There are similar for CDs (http://www.find-cd.co.uk/) and DVDs (http://www.find-dvd.co.uk/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on May 12, 2014, 05:03:29 pm
The Training Effect : Methods by Steve House & Scott Johnston (http://www.rockandice.com/lates-news/the-training-effect-words-from-steve-house) an extract from the aforementioned book.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on June 03, 2014, 07:36:32 am
Just added a link to the UKB Wiki page Training : The Science (http://ukbouldering.com/wiki/index.php/Training_:_The_Science#General) for...

Training for Climbing by Eric Horst (http://www.nicros.com/articles/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Sloper on June 03, 2014, 09:19:35 am
I have a good but old book called 'training for mobility' free to a good home.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on June 03, 2014, 09:21:44 am
I have a good but old book called 'training for mobility' free to a good home.

Physical or social? :clown:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Sloper on June 03, 2014, 11:03:20 am
+1, physical, in my social mobility library I have a range of texts from 'The road to Serfdom' to 'Crush that Prole'.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on August 25, 2014, 06:40:04 pm
Udo Neumann (https://www.facebook.com/udo.neumann?fref=ts) videos about coaching the German bouldering team:

Part 1 (http://youtu.be/a3OHYeYjOpE)

Part 2 (http://youtu.be/VANvwvLKDM8)
(Part 2 has lots of routesetters talking in German and not enough Jule Wurm :wub:)

Part 3 (http://youtu.be/bY6nDgIm1NI?list=UUfWrBweMrEigiXq9DVCG4_Q)

Part 4 (http://youtu.be/2WHTBh-MJbE)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on September 03, 2014, 02:08:58 pm
http://www.t-nation.com/training/current-state-of-sc-coaching (http://www.t-nation.com/training/current-state-of-sc-coaching)
Rippetoe is God and this is his Bible.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on December 01, 2014, 02:34:37 pm
After the article about alcohol, now one about weed.
[urlhttp://www.t-nation.com/training/lifters-guide-to-marijuana][/url]
Not much science due to lack of data and human experiments, but the point is that weed has negative physical effects on performance.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jwi on December 20, 2014, 08:27:38 am
Just a reminder of the high prevalence of injuries in young climbers http://m.bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/1/44.short?rss=1
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on January 06, 2015, 10:35:10 am
http://www.t-nation.com/training/predator-conditioning (http://www.t-nation.com/training/predator-conditioning)
Always build or retain muscle.
Amen.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: thekettle on January 22, 2015, 04:12:03 pm
http://www.bmcshop.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=357_203&products_id=7011 (http://www.bmcshop.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=357_203&products_id=7011)
New book on the head game. Aimed at route climbers but very applicable to bouldering too (particularly 'fear of failure'). Concisely written (by two Psychology PhDs!), with largely jargon-free science supporting lots of practical exercises for translating it into results!  :2thumbsup:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Denbob99 on January 22, 2015, 04:52:22 pm
Will have to pick this up, my head is holding back my sport climbing in a huge way at the minute and need to get it sorted!
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: measles23 on January 22, 2015, 09:49:02 pm
http://www.t-nation.com/training/current-state-of-sc-coaching (http://www.t-nation.com/training/current-state-of-sc-coaching)
Rippetoe is God and this is his Bible.

Hate to rock your faith Nibs but the Lord Thy God Rippetoe doth disapprove of your feeble efforts with 1-armers:

7th Commandment: "We know how to make people stronger. It doesn't involve single-leg anythings, single-arm anythings...."

 :P
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on January 23, 2015, 04:46:45 am
The next time I am getting punted off my project I will remember this and tell myself: " It is because you don't use barbells effectively."  Who needs finger strength when you can deadlift 5 sport climbers at once?  :strongbench:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on January 23, 2015, 06:21:08 am
Will have to pick this up, my head is holding back my sport climbing in a huge way at the minute and need to get it sorted!

Don McGrath, one of the authors of Vertical Mind, has quite a few articles online that I personally didn't find that compelling. But you can read them and then decide if the book might be for you, so that's a plus.

What I have found worthwhile is Arno Ilgner's Espresso Lessons. Concise, apparently sensible advice without the New-Ageyness that I gather put some people off his other, longer book. (I can't help you with the fact that it's twice as expensive on amazon uk kindle as on amazon.de though)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: creedence on January 23, 2015, 10:16:24 am
Will have to pick this up, my head is holding back my sport climbing in a huge way at the minute and need to get it sorted!
What I have found worthwhile is Arno Ilgner's Espresso Lessons. Concise, apparently sensible advice without the New-Ageyness that I gather put some people off his other, longer book. (I can't help you with the fact that it's twice as expensive on amazon uk kindle as on amazon.de though)

Any idea how it compares to the full book?  I left the Rock Warriors Way on a plane shortly after I started reading it  :slap:, so need to rebuy it, but may opt for the more concise 'Espresso Lessons'.

Additionally, looking for the above on Amazon, lead me to this:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climb-With-Power-Strength-Conditioning-ebook/dp/B00OGTY1W4/ref=pd_sim_kinc_4?ie=UTF8&refRID=1A1MZGFP1VNFESMPRKHN (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climb-With-Power-Strength-Conditioning-ebook/dp/B00OGTY1W4/ref=pd_sim_kinc_4?ie=UTF8&refRID=1A1MZGFP1VNFESMPRKHN)

Has anyone read that?  It's cheap enough that I'm tempted and appears as if it may present a useful collation of core exercises, and the look inside presents classic quotes such as this:
Quote
Start your day with the same relaxing song.  I like Bob Marley's Three Little Birds.  When busy thoughts enter your head answer them with a phase [sic] you have chosen. 'breathe deeper', 'I am a fucking ninja'...
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on January 23, 2015, 01:24:23 pm
Never heard of Sean Mapoles, but he appears to have a sense of humour & it's four Euros on amazon.de kindle. Sold.

I mean, at that price, even if the advice is all crap there's the guaranteed fitness benefit from not drinking the one-and-a-bit beers
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on January 23, 2015, 01:32:07 pm
http://www.t-nation.com/training/current-state-of-sc-coaching (http://www.t-nation.com/training/current-state-of-sc-coaching)
Rippetoe is God and this is his Bible.

Hate to rock your faith Nibs but the Lord Thy God Rippetoe doth disapprove of your feeble efforts with 1-armers:

7th Commandment: "We know how to make people stronger. It doesn't involve single-leg anythings, single-arm anythings...."

 :P
Sad but true.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on January 23, 2015, 03:41:16 pm
I have read it.  I didn't find much in it beyond a few entertaining quotes.   




Has anyone read that?  It's cheap enough that I'm tempted and appears as if it may present a useful collation of core exercises, and the look inside presents classic quotes such as this:
Quote
Start your day with the same relaxing song.  I like Bob Marley's Three Little Birds.  When busy thoughts enter your head answer them with a phase [sic] you have chosen. 'breathe deeper', 'I am a fucking ninja'...
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on January 24, 2015, 12:05:42 pm
Lauersen JB, Bertelsen DM, Andersen LB (2014) The effectiveness of exercise interventions to prevent sports injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Br J Sports Med 48:871-877 (http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/11/871.full?sid=19efc261-b870-4eaa-88c0-31fda65de99f)


Letter to the Editor In response to: Jeppe Bo Lauersen, Ditte Marie Bertelsen, Lars Bo Andersen. (http://blogs.bmj.com/bjsm/2014/07/20/exercises-to-prevent-sports-injuries-lots-of-talk-but-do-they-work/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: fatneck on February 06, 2015, 10:56:06 am
Good core training article on UKC...

http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=7059 (http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=7059)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: duncan on February 06, 2015, 01:42:48 pm
Line by line I disagreed with almost everything in it. Some of my differences are opinion but some emphatically are not just opinion. I know one of the authors so I'll avoid being too argumentative.

And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: fatneck on February 06, 2015, 02:30:35 pm
Quote
And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes

Agree with this...
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on February 06, 2015, 02:44:46 pm

Line by line I disagreed with almost everything in it. Some of my differences are opinion but some emphatically are not just opinion. I know one of the authors so I'll avoid being too argumentative.

And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.

You can't be allowed to get away with that.

'Fess up! What's wrong and why?

😜

(Caveat, just skimmed it because I'm working, will read it properly this evening).
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on February 06, 2015, 02:57:15 pm
I haven't read it all either, but judging by the pics enlightening the muscles (the abs), it could be that it completely overlooks glutes and hamstrings.
I've found out, by training specifically core tension on my board, that staying put on steep terrain with small feet involves tons of pulling with glutes and hamstrings, along with abs.
Abs work only the lower torso, stopping at the pelvis, but then you have your legs that have to stay tight to maintain contact with the footholds. And abs don't move legs.
And the usual demonstrative video. Glutes and hamstrings engage to push the pelvis up after putting the foot on the foothold.
Core training on Vimeo (http://vimeo.com/106872789)

Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on February 13, 2015, 01:42:58 pm
http://www.t-nation.com/training/best-way-to-lift-weights (http://www.t-nation.com/training/best-way-to-lift-weights)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on February 16, 2015, 01:41:06 pm
http://www.t-nation.com/training/core-confusion (http://www.t-nation.com/training/core-confusion)
Core involves shoulders, neck, glutes, etc.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: mrjonathanr on February 16, 2015, 01:58:02 pm

And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.

How many fingers should the shoes have then?  :-\
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: habrich on February 16, 2015, 08:49:38 pm
I thought this was quite a good blog post .... in theory aimed at small girls who crimp too much, it probably speaks usefully to old dads like me.

https://www.trainingbeta.com/shannon-forsman-how-more-than-crimp/ (https://www.trainingbeta.com/shannon-forsman-how-more-than-crimp/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: duncan on February 16, 2015, 09:40:46 pm

And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.

How many fingers should the shoes have then?  :-\

 ;D

Flippancy aside, they are of a piece with much of the content of the article. 

Each stage of the proposed nasty western lifestyle leads to weak core leads to pain was disproven years ago. The appeal is the usual ‘natural is good' tosh. See also barefoot running, paleo. diets, anthrax, deadly nightshade and dentistry without anaesthetic (I'm not completely sure about the last one).

The incidence of back pain is just as high in developing as in western countries, it only seems less because most folk in developing countries don't seek help because they can't afford to or have more pressing things to worry about.

There is no proven relationship between core muscle function and back pain. The highly influential theory that transversus abdominis acts as a 'corset' that 'stabilises' the spine has been disproven. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066.) I spent some time studying transversus abdominis function and I have to conclude I was probably wasting my time. http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6 (http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6)

Many people find Pilates/yoga/'core stability' training helpful for back pain but the way these exercises work doesn't seem to have anything to do with core muscles getting stronger or working differently. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280) The latest theory is that their effect is down to 'mindful movement'. Watch this space.

I've done two RTCs investigating 'core training' treatments for back pain and in both cases the core training was no better than general exercises (for the 'wrong' muscles if you believe the UKC article). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614)  Core training is clearly better than doing nothing but not better than doing some other activity. Dozens of other trials have similar conclusions. The latest systematic review concluded that no more clinical trials of core training are needed because the evidence for this is so strong. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/ (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on February 16, 2015, 09:58:56 pm


And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.

How many fingers should the shoes have then?  :-\

 ;D

Flippancy aside, they are of a piece with much of the content of the article. 

Each stage of the proposed nasty western lifestyle leads to weak core leads to pain was disproven years ago. The appeal is the usual ‘natural is good' tosh. See also barefoot running, paleo. diets, anthrax, deadly nightshade and dentistry without anaesthetic (I'm not completely sure about the last one).

The incidence of back pain is just as high in developing as in western countries, it only seems less because most folk in developing countries don't seek help because they can't afford to or have more pressing things to worry about.

There is no proven relationship between core muscle function and back pain. The highly influential theory that transversus abdominis acts as a 'corset' that 'stabilises' the spine has been disproven. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066.) I spent some time studying transversus abdominis function and I have to conclude I was probably wasting my time. http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6 (http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6)

Many people find Pilates/yoga/'core stability' training helpful for back pain but the way these exercises work doesn't seem to have anything to do with core muscles getting stronger or working differently. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280) The latest theory is that their effect is down to 'mindful movement'. Watch this space.

I've done two RTCs investigating 'core training' treatments for back pain and in both cases the core training was no better than general exercises (for the 'wrong' muscles if you believe the UKC article). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614)  Core training is clearly better than doing nothing but not better than doing some other activity. Dozens of other trials have similar conclusions. The latest systematic review concluded that no more clinical trials of core training are needed because the evidence for this is so strong. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/ (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/)

Wow!

It's OMM Xmas...

I shall mostly be reading the rest of the week. Ta.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on February 16, 2015, 10:10:58 pm
On a side note.

My ten years or so in and out of Eastern Europe, time in Africa, South America and Asia has left me under no illusions as to the benefits of a "primitive" lifestyle and diet.
"Backbreaking" work is not a euphemism.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: tj on February 17, 2015, 07:55:56 am
Cheers for posting the above, Duncan.

In a slightly more digestible format (for me at least!), Ben Smith talks about the findings of the aforementioned systematic review-

http://chewshealth.co.uk/the-physio-matters-podcast/ (http://chewshealth.co.uk/the-physio-matters-podcast/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on February 18, 2015, 10:00:00 am


And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.

How many fingers should the shoes have then?  :-\

 ;D

Flippancy aside, they are of a piece with much of the content of the article. 

Each stage of the proposed nasty western lifestyle leads to weak core leads to pain was disproven years ago. The appeal is the usual ‘natural is good' tosh. See also barefoot running, paleo. diets, anthrax, deadly nightshade and dentistry without anaesthetic (I'm not completely sure about the last one).

The incidence of back pain is just as high in developing as in western countries, it only seems less because most folk in developing countries don't seek help because they can't afford to or have more pressing things to worry about.

There is no proven relationship between core muscle function and back pain. The highly influential theory that transversus abdominis acts as a 'corset' that 'stabilises' the spine has been disproven. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066.) I spent some time studying transversus abdominis function and I have to conclude I was probably wasting my time. http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6 (http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6)

Many people find Pilates/yoga/'core stability' training helpful for back pain but the way these exercises work doesn't seem to have anything to do with core muscles getting stronger or working differently. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280) The latest theory is that their effect is down to 'mindful movement'. Watch this space.

I've done two RTCs investigating 'core training' treatments for back pain and in both cases the core training was no better than general exercises (for the 'wrong' muscles if you believe the UKC article). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614)  Core training is clearly better than doing nothing but not better than doing some other activity. Dozens of other trials have similar conclusions. The latest systematic review concluded that no more clinical trials of core training are needed because the evidence for this is so strong. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/ (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/)

So, having now read most of this....

My impression is that so-called  "Core specific" exercises are no more (but equally no less) beneficial than general strength training and that taken with this (that I posted earlier on the stretching thread)
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/11/871.full?sid=19efc261-b870-4eaa-88c0-31fda65de99f
Good, overall, balanced strength training; including a modicum of flexibility work and the avoidance of overly specific routines, might be the way ahead...
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Rocksteady on March 02, 2015, 01:36:06 pm

And I can't take anyone seriously who still wears those five finger shoes.

How many fingers should the shoes have then?  :-\

 ;D

Flippancy aside, they are of a piece with much of the content of the article. 

Each stage of the proposed nasty western lifestyle leads to weak core leads to pain was disproven years ago. The appeal is the usual ‘natural is good' tosh. See also barefoot running, paleo. diets, anthrax, deadly nightshade and dentistry without anaesthetic (I'm not completely sure about the last one).

The incidence of back pain is just as high in developing as in western countries, it only seems less because most folk in developing countries don't seek help because they can't afford to or have more pressing things to worry about.

There is no proven relationship between core muscle function and back pain. The highly influential theory that transversus abdominis acts as a 'corset' that 'stabilises' the spine has been disproven. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22000066.) I spent some time studying transversus abdominis function and I have to conclude I was probably wasting my time. http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6 (http://tinyurl.com/l7q2ow6)

Many people find Pilates/yoga/'core stability' training helpful for back pain but the way these exercises work doesn't seem to have anything to do with core muscles getting stronger or working differently. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22146280) The latest theory is that their effect is down to 'mindful movement'. Watch this space.

I've done two RTCs investigating 'core training' treatments for back pain and in both cases the core training was no better than general exercises (for the 'wrong' muscles if you believe the UKC article). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17572614)  Core training is clearly better than doing nothing but not better than doing some other activity. Dozens of other trials have similar conclusions. The latest systematic review concluded that no more clinical trials of core training are needed because the evidence for this is so strong. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/ (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/15/416/)

All the resources you've quoted seem to be about the ineffectiveness of 'core' training to remedy back pain. That's well established. But the UKC article was about strengthening your core to improve your climbing, with only one small reference to western lifestyles disengaging the core.

Do you disagree that using the exercises in the article would improve your core strength in such a way that would benefit your climbing?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: duncan on March 02, 2015, 09:56:26 pm
All the resources you've quoted seem to be about the ineffectiveness of 'core' training to remedy back pain. That's well established. But the UKC article was about strengthening your core to improve your climbing ...

Do you disagree that using the exercises in the article would improve your core strength in such a way that would benefit your climbing?

I don't doubt the importance of back, hip, shoulder and abdominal muscles for harder bouldering or steep sport routes. I think the jury is still out on the need to train those muscles in isolation. The authors propose that all climbers can improve by doing specific core training. I think this is complete nonsense. Are they really saying that your average VS/F6a/V3 punter - the relationship of the grades tells you all you need to know about the major weakness of most 'average' climbers - would benefit from core training? 

One of the key principles of strength training is specificity. Climbers obsess over to what degree training open-handed carries over to crimping, recognising that training has to be highly specific to work. And yet when it comes to training the trunk muscles this seems to be completely forgotten! All kinds of completely non-specific exercises are recommended. Most work on specificity has been done on lower limb exercise but we did a study on different types of abdominal muscle training and found it applies here too. People who followed a Pilates programme improved activation of trans. abs. when doing Pilates exercises but not in other tests. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075038 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075038)
The take-home message is that trunk muscle exercises must closely resemble climbing to help your climbing.

One of the theses of the UKC article (and it is repeated elsewhere) is that adding instability to an exercise, using gym balls for example, will increase the activation of the deeper muscles like transversus abdominis. I've researched this and we found the trans. abs. were not working any harder sitting on a gym ball than on a chair http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16009592 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16009592)
The exercise may feel harder but it's not because the deepest trunk muscles are working more.  Adding instability is a standard practice in training for sports like football and rugby where there is a lot of uncertainty and the playing surface is unstable. Adding instability is specific for these sports. Climbing is not like this and it is lazy to simply assume that because something feels harder (because it is unstable) that it will be benefiting you more. A more speculative thought is that training in a way that doesn't resemble the real activity might actually reduce your performance. Ondra makes this point in his fascinating trainingbeta interview, he is acutely aware that training with a vest inhibits his movement efficiency even as he gets stronger. This seems an important point lost on the personal trainers now moving into climbing coaching.

So if you wish to train your core or your posterior chain or whatever, don't just think about which muscles to train, think about how to train them. Your exercises should as closely resemble the climbing moves you want to improve as possible. Superman exercises may target the back and hip extensors but I doubt if they will do much for your rock-overs, dynoing, or even keeping your feet on for 20 minutes in the Grande Grotta despite targeting the 'right' muscles. They might even reduce your movement efficiency by training trunk muscle to co-contract leading to an over-rigid trunk.

You might just be better focusing on learning moving effectively on a steep board to get better at climbing on steep rock.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: mrjonathanr on March 02, 2015, 10:33:24 pm

You might just be better focusing on learning moving effectively on a steep board to get better at climbing on steep rock.

(http://www.idioms4you.com/img/angif-hit-the-nail-on-the-head.gif)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: krymson on April 16, 2015, 04:31:39 am
Looks like it's been mentioned before but not posted yet so I'll do the honors

Training Beta's interview with Adam Ondra (https://www.trainingbeta.com/media/tbp-017-adam-ondra-things-training/?portfolioID=3838)

Lots of things that could be better and certainly not most efficient interview to listen to if you want training-dense information, but it offers a lot of insight into the making of probably the best climber in the world.

The most poignant training bits to me were the fact that he didnt start campusing or doing what he considered as "training" until he was 16, and that for the world cup he was doing hardcore  patxi-style training 6 days a week with a university courseload, campusing twice a day sometimes.
 :jaw:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Sasquatch on April 21, 2015, 10:11:04 pm
another link for the front page:

http://www.stevemaischtraining.com/ (http://www.stevemaischtraining.com/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Denbob99 on April 22, 2015, 11:08:18 pm
Really nice site that one, skimmed it just now and will dig into it properly tomorrow. Wish he had a few more pictures of the 'shrimp board' he mentions.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on April 23, 2015, 12:56:14 am
Here are a few pictures of the shrimpshrine: http://easyinstagram.com/shrimpshrine
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: a dense loner on April 23, 2015, 07:40:43 am
Good looking board that. Won't get to read the blurb for few days tho. Like Steve Maisch's stuff
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Pako on May 12, 2015, 11:34:10 am
http://www.catsclimbing.com/search/label/Blog The first 2 posts are brilliant for showing someone how and why you should climb strong on a steep board. The video section of the blog is also quality for some simple beasting from some very very strong men.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: a dense loner on May 12, 2015, 06:33:44 pm
Pako where's the video section? Am I being an idiot? There are some strong peeps who use cats, half of whom have prob never been outdoors. Very wise  ;D
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on May 12, 2015, 06:44:37 pm
Pako where's the video section? Am I being an idiot?

Top right under "Navigation" is a "Video" link that takes you to their Vimeo page.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: a dense loner on May 12, 2015, 06:54:57 pm
Cheers slackers, was on the mobile version which didn't offer any choices. Switched to main website et voila. Will keep my eyes open for stuff like that in future  :sorry:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: lagerstarfish on May 12, 2015, 08:28:01 pm
for fuck's sake

they do the decent thing and ban heels; then they go on about how using thumbs is OK!

I, for one, will not be visiting their grade brothel until things change of the better
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Pako on May 12, 2015, 09:46:16 pm
for fuck's sake

they do the decent thing and ban heels; then they go on about how using thumbs is OK!

I, for one, will not be visiting their grade brothel until things change of the better

Yeah the thumb idea was a bit interesting, but it makes sense in a way I suppose. I can't really think of a situation where you can't crimp a hold, and it is the stronger grip, so... If he was advocating pinching the sides of every hold then it would be a different story, but he isn't.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: iain on May 21, 2015, 09:21:22 am
For Duma
On my phone amd can't find the training resource thread, but here will do. Training beta podcast with pooch: https://www.trainingbeta.com/media/tbp-021-alex-puccio/

and while I'm here:
It has been mentioned already elsewhere but definitely deserves inclusion in this thread. Alex Barrows interviewed at Training Beta.
https://www.trainingbeta.com/media/alex-barrows/?portfolioID=3838

Bill Ramsay up next on that site too ... should be good hopefully.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on May 21, 2015, 09:56:23 am
Train like a Pro : Q&A with Magnus Midtbo (http://www.sublimeclimbing.com/blogs/train-like-a-pro/18656452-train-like-a-pro-q-a-with-magnus-midtbo)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on May 22, 2015, 05:56:36 pm
Whilst I have no opinion (feel free to educate me) on "Triggerpoint therapy", I find this useful.

http://www.myofascialtherapy.org/symptom-checker.html

Helps with understanding the root of a problem and describes where pain might be referred for specific muscle injuries.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on June 08, 2015, 10:28:44 pm
A three part series with Usobiaga, Andrada, and Marin training and climbing.  Not sure if it belongs here or somewhere else. 

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Onwh1roSM-Y

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9CgRSsvD5U

Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqBDTGiZdxE
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on June 18, 2015, 10:42:30 am
Literature Review of Isometric Strength Training by Steve Maisch (http://www.stevemaischtraining.com/isometric-strength-training.html)  :coffee:

Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on July 15, 2015, 08:55:23 pm
A few training pieces by Will Anglin: http://willanglin.squarespace.com/training/
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Duma on July 15, 2015, 10:07:14 pm
Is that what Will Atkinson is calling himself now he's a fisherman?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: andy_e on July 16, 2015, 08:29:21 am
Yeah, then renaming himself to Will Ganglin' when he inevitably returns to lanking climbing.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Pako on August 06, 2015, 11:46:39 am
Anyone have any good articles on antagonist training for climbing? An article on good antagonist gym exercises for climbing would be much appreciated.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on August 12, 2015, 02:29:25 pm
I will leave it for you to judge if it is good, but it wasn't awful in my opinion: http://cragmama.com/2012/03/extracurricular-training-part-1-the-antagonists/
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: blamo on August 20, 2015, 02:07:56 pm
Here is a recent article on relative importance of muscle groups in climbing: http://timyfairfield.com/file_download/37/RELATIVE+IMPORTANCE+OF+FOUR+MUSCLE+GROUPS+FOR+INDOOR+ROCK+CLIMBING+PERFORMANCE%2C+2015.pdf
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on November 30, 2015, 02:56:28 pm
Guido Köstermeyer has a blog (http://blog.klettertraining.de/)

It's entirely not in English, but google translate might be able to help to some degree.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on December 19, 2015, 08:48:06 am
One of the best articles ever on conditioning.
http://www.t-nation.com/workouts/fat-loss-4-workout-protocol (http://www.t-nation.com/workouts/fat-loss-4-workout-protocol)
You know it makes sense, so...
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: TheTwig on December 19, 2015, 09:13:31 am
One of the best articles ever on conditioning.
http://www.t-nation.com/workouts/fat-loss-4-workout-protocol (http://www.t-nation.com/workouts/fat-loss-4-workout-protocol)
You know it makes sense, so...

Looks like the bastard stepchild of crossfit and tabata, I'll try it  ;D
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on December 19, 2015, 09:26:02 am
And you'll be rewarded.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on January 13, 2016, 09:26:15 am
Climbing Training with Robbie Phillips (http://www.edelrid.de/en/climbing-training-with-robbie-phillips/)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s99suMzyiU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yksFdXDglj4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4pGrqbNJCs
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on January 27, 2016, 09:05:23 pm
http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=8023 (http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=8023)


Link UKC's interview with Neil Gresham's about his fingerboard app.
Used app to get back into finger boarding, using beginner level.
Seems to be pretty comprehensive.
Includes warmups and warm down.
Calibration adding removing weight etc.
All in all a better bet than the beast maker app.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on February 02, 2016, 09:18:44 pm
Nice trx routine  :weakbench:
https://vimeo.com/153876451 (https://vimeo.com/153876451)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on February 17, 2016, 09:13:21 am
If you are of the iSad disposition and haven't looked at the iTunes U thingamabobbydubrymawatchit (which I never had).
There are some excellent bits and bobs available for ŁFa. I found a great set of resources/books/vids etc at A level (? Actually an Auzzy Int. Baccalaureate, I think that's A level) Sport science/PE.

Never tried linking to iTunes, so I guess it only works through the iTunes U app (I heard there is an Android version, but not sure).


https://itunes.apple.com/gb/course/sport-exercise-health-science/id815828325




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on February 17, 2016, 02:19:21 pm
About overtraining.
https://www.t-nation.com/training/what-overtraining-is-and-isnt (https://www.t-nation.com/training/what-overtraining-is-and-isnt)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on February 25, 2016, 07:15:27 am
About dieting strategies.
https://www.t-nation.com/diet-fat-loss/dieting-disasters?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=article1986 (https://www.t-nation.com/diet-fat-loss/dieting-disasters?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=article1986)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on March 02, 2016, 02:35:31 pm
And, again, about why you should attach the weight on the back for loaded pull ups.
https://www.t-nation.com/training/tip-for-pull-ups-hang-weight-in-the-back (https://www.t-nation.com/training/tip-for-pull-ups-hang-weight-in-the-back)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Muenchener on March 24, 2016, 07:02:30 am
Short but quite interesting interview with Steve House on theclymb.com (http://blog.theclymb.com/passions/mountaineer/alpine-fitness-mentorship-interview-steve-house/)

Quote
What peo­ple need to under­stand is the cor­rect time­frame for train­ing is not weeks, but it’s months or years. A lot of peo­ple will say they’ve been train­ing for two weeks, but that’s not train­ing. Train­ing hap­pens when you’re doing cumu­la­tive, grad­ual, pro­gres­sive exer­cise over many, many months.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: boxmonkey on March 29, 2016, 06:34:37 am
Been finding this thread really helpful.

Have you guys come across any apps that help with training plans? I've looked at a few but they all have fairly poor reviews. There seem to be a lot of great books out there but none which have been translated into an app that combines the info you need to progress along with the training plan/diary feature some of the apps offer.

Anyway, this thread is really helpful.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: westyb3 on March 29, 2016, 08:41:16 pm
Here's a little conditioning article I put together for Highball Bouldering Centre, Norwich. It covers a mixture of my favourite exercises that I like to do off the climbing wall.

http://highballclimbingnorwich.com/blog/ben-west-training-plan-for-climbing/

For more articles, info and training tips check out:

http://up-grade.uk/ to keep up to date.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on April 24, 2016, 05:06:07 pm
https://vimeo.com/162974205 (https://vimeo.com/162974205)
Mr Campus in Germany, the clip at the end from back in the day is brill. :strongbench:
Who needs dungarees when you can climb in shorts like that.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on June 08, 2016, 08:45:46 pm
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TvGP8VLwIJk (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TvGP8VLwIJk)
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UvXYHX0AL9M (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UvXYHX0AL9M)
A really interesting insight into pro training.
Hats off to Sean for doing this.
 :strongbench:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: tk421a on June 22, 2016, 08:51:35 pm
Really interesting Training Beta podcast from Neely's shoulder surgeon.

https://www.trainingbeta.com/media/tom-hackett/
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: a dense loner on June 22, 2016, 09:21:54 pm
I liked seans training vids, hope he does more of em. It's the mundane that's more interesting than the magic bullet!
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on October 21, 2016, 09:37:54 pm
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IsNZ0k-3cc0 (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IsNZ0k-3cc0)
Want to get strong, might do some of this. :strongbench:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on October 22, 2016, 10:56:53 am
jfdm,
I don't want to piss on your chips/video, but that's not very accurate. There's surely some strength training involved (campusing) but no power training. None of those excercises have a speed component, and power is strength x speed.
Also, there's no finger strength training. Endurance, yes, strength, no.
Moreover, the warm up part is very superficial.
Route climbing as a warm up for campusing? Yes, but book an appointment with your phisio first.
Each session should have a general warm up (gentle route climbing maybe) and a specific warm up prior to each excercise, that mimic the excercise at a lower intensity but with the same movement patterns.
My point is: if someone wants to give public training advice, the least they could do is do it well.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jwi on October 22, 2016, 12:00:57 pm
Well, short strength endurance (i.e. training that increase dL/dt like the finger-board protocol in the video) has some spill-over effects on strength, especially in the untrained individual (like me, e.g.). So there's always that.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on October 22, 2016, 03:10:42 pm
Yes, absolutely, almost anything will help somehow.
I was just pointing out that, in my opinion, the whole thing wasn't accurately made and was somehow misleading.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on October 22, 2016, 03:54:54 pm
Thanks Nibs, wasn't thinking about following the whole of the video to the letter.
Just some bits.
Agreed warm-up hopeless, just some guy route climbing.
I've been bouldering on plastic for about 3-4 yrs.
Having climbed quite a bit when I was younger. Inside/outside. Now 40.
Making some progress, v4/5 range by simply climbing 2-3 times a week.
Now want to do something more than just potter around.
Was thinking about once a week, strengthen dynamic snap and fingers.
Warm up routine - limbering 10-15 mins.
Easy probs for half hour - climbing warm up.
Some easy campusing on huge rounded rungs 2-4 round ladders.
Then some campusing, at wall only have medium campus rungs. Again ladders 2-4 rounds.
Do for 4 weeks. Then evaluate. Don't do above if tired.
Done the above for 2 weeks so far so good.
Weak areas for me flexability and generating power to move dynamically between holds.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Murph on October 22, 2016, 04:24:36 pm
Ok so that workout is a bit of everything.

But the campus routine, that is training power yeah? Or not at all? Or is the criticism that it is inferior to, say, a plyometric campus routine? Sorry if this is a dumb question...

Asking cos strength is not one of my weaknesses but "going for it" is, which is possibly because of a lack of power (as well as general technical crapness). I am looking to address this weakness in the coming months through embarking on some form of campus routine but currently shopping around for what to actually do this nice I get under the board.

Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on October 22, 2016, 06:06:22 pm
Hey,
I'm currently unable to reply properly because I'm about to go out. If noone else replies sooner, I'll drop a few ideas tomorrow.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Murph on October 22, 2016, 06:44:52 pm
Appreciate it nibs (or anyone else willing to advise).

FWIW, this is the routine I was looking to build something from. The plyo bit sounds a bit scary so was going to dip a toe in the water with the basics first.

Happy to start another thread of this isn't the place.

http://www.powercompanyclimbing.com/blog/2015/04/campusing-part-1-for-powerbig-rungs-big.html
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jwi on October 22, 2016, 11:29:33 pm
Power needs to be trained at loads of 30-60% of max, at as high velocity as possible for the given load. Very very few people can train power by pulling footless.

Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L31 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Murph on October 23, 2016, 08:21:02 am
So feet/foot on campusing for power?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on October 23, 2016, 11:01:48 am
Power needs to be trained at loads of 30-60% of max, at as high velocity as possible for the given load. Very very few people can train power by pulling footless.

Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L31 using Tapatalk

Regardng the last sentence. This depends on the available equipment. If you are using a Campus board, sure, because most people lack the finger strength/conditioning.
However, if you take finger strength as separate issue during initial build up; a bar provides all you need. Starting with pull-up catches (where you pull up dynamically and briefly release the bar at the apex of the move), progressing through pull-up claps, Pull-up reaches (reaching as high above the bar as possible with each hand in turn) and eventually Muscle -ups.
Also, over sized Campus rungs or a rigid Bachar ladder, allow for a phased intro into footless Campusing.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jwi on October 23, 2016, 11:12:14 am
If you can do a single pullup (two arms) at or close to double bodyweight, by all mean train to increase power by doing quick pullups, otherwise some form of aid is needed. Steep board climbing w/ long moves?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Nibile on October 23, 2016, 02:17:08 pm
Ok so that workout is a bit of everything.

But the campus routine, that is training power yeah? Or not at all? Or is the criticism that it is inferior to, say, a plyometric campus routine? Sorry if this is a dumb question...

Asking cos strength is not one of my weaknesses but "going for it" is, which is possibly because of a lack of power (as well as general technical crapness). I am looking to address this weakness in the coming months through embarking on some form of campus routine but currently shopping around for what to actually do this nice I get under the board.
As others have said, speed is the essential component of power. So, to increase power you need to work at speed, whatever you do.
Regular campusing isn't fast enough, it's a bit more grinding through, and there also could be the fingers limiting factor.
Fast pull ups on a bar could be a good way to go, but as of late I'm getting more and more interested in full body power, because it has a greater effect on overall power output, nervous recruitment, etc.
So, I'm doing hill sprints, boxing bag, Olympic-style lifting, and even normal weights, focusing on speed.
Contrast training is also very useful and effective, but you have to be prepared.

In any case, if you feel that "going for it" is your weakness, I don't think it's related to power. To me it seems more a matter of "knack", of trying to latch the next hold despite being close to falling. I think that you could see good gains by practicing quite dynamic climbing, using holds that you can't lock off, so that you get used to go for it in an all out effort.
On the other hand, you can still become so strong that "going fo it" isn't anymore necessary.
 ;D
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Murph on October 23, 2016, 07:22:12 pm
Thanks chaps lots of powerful advice here much appreciated.

I guess I'm drawn to the campus board because it seems pretty systematic to record training sessions and thereby set the bar higher next time. At least that's the attraction compared to limit bouldering where more variables and distractions  come into play. But it isn't the only option and, as nibs said, could just be ground out which won't help with power much/at all.

Thanks specially for the pull up variation ideas. It's not just about weighted slow pulls with "good" form. Think I can make that work actually.

And as to the "become so strong" suggestion.... haha, yes of course for a specific problem but then it wouldn't be the limit any more, surely?!  :worms:
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Murph on October 23, 2016, 07:26:09 pm
If you can do a single pullup (two arms) at or close to double bodyweight, by all mean train to increase power by doing quick pullups otherwise...

Hello, are you saying I would need to do 2x bw pull ups to train power on a pull-up bar? I can do nowhere near that, surely just doing some pull ups quickly with the aim of getting air time etc, as per OMMs suggestion would be a solid road to seeing gains?
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: tomtom on October 23, 2016, 07:31:53 pm
Reading this article makes my elbows hurt :D
Title: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Oldmanmatt on October 23, 2016, 08:33:04 pm
I would say I was quite strong, but I have a PB of 64kg additional for 3 reps @75kg BW.
For ref, I can 1:5:7 on medium (24mm) rungs and 2:6:9 (matching) on large (34mm) rungs with a 4kg weight belt. (21cm spacing).
I know this is "average" or "meh" as Campusing goes.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: Brannock on October 27, 2016, 09:47:52 am
Steve House has a new website (http://www.uphillathlete.com/), mostly around selling training plans/coaching but also has some articles on Alpinism/mountain running/skimo etc.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on November 16, 2016, 08:38:45 pm
http://willanglin.squarespace.com (http://willanglin.squarespace.com)
Wealth of info this site.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on January 04, 2017, 09:03:52 pm
What goes on during lattice test.
I'd love to have a go but don't meet the entry requirements just yet.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cSnbxuqAjLA (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cSnbxuqAjLA)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on January 05, 2017, 09:19:58 am
http://willanglin.squarespace.com (http://willanglin.squarespace.com)
Wealth of info this site.

Will Anglin Ask Me Anything (AMA) on /r/climbharder 2017-01-08 (https://www.reddit.com/r/climbharder/comments/5lvb0u/promo_will_anglin_ama_sunday_january_8) thread might be posted Friday (2017-01-06) for questions to accrue.
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: thekettle on March 05, 2017, 09:19:14 pm
Not strictly climbing, but for those that strength train off the wall, I think this is an excellent read. All about taking a biomechanically sound approach to strength training, reducing stress on the joints and spine:
https://www.amazon.com/Congruent-Exercise-Weight-Training-Easier/dp/1467930415 (https://www.amazon.com/Congruent-Exercise-Weight-Training-Easier/dp/1467930415)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on June 02, 2017, 07:32:15 pm
One for the dead hangers, top work from Dave.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eKwkKaKluuk (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eKwkKaKluuk)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: moose on June 02, 2017, 10:57:09 pm
Looks very similar to the Lopez protocol:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4Gh8hOjIsg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4Gh8hOjIsg)

My own  Lopez derived regime, employed when enthused / ovewhelmed by the difficulty of a project, is to calibrate by finding the max added weight for a 13s hang.  Then, each session, after a suitable warm-up (I do 6x7/3s repeaters on a 18mm edge, followed by the same on 14, 12, and 10 mm edges) I do a progression of 10s hangs at 50%, 80%, and 90% of the max. 

The meat of the session is then 10s hangs at the max added weight (as many as I can manage, generally 5-8). 

Every 3-4 weeks I change to a different sized hold (I tend to alternate between 18mm and 12-14mm - any smaller and skin loss / pain raher than finger strength seem to become limiting).   

Main problem using big holds is that the amount of added weight for 2 arm hangs can become intolerable.  I  had a few sessions of putting on the weight belt / weighted harness etc, falling over, and being unable to stand up!  One-armers with a pulley and assistance are more comfortable - the sessions just take a little longer. 

Currently in such a "max hang" phase, scared into it by  how weak I feel after a long hiatus from fingerboarding (just used a woodie instead over winter).  Thankfully, I am slowly reverting to my old marks.  When I do, given that I have a power-endurance project, I think changing to Probes' 5x5x5x5 routine would be appropriate - I recall that programme felt horrendous, which suggests it was beneficial!  Incidentally, although the calibration routines are different, I found that the actual amount of added weight (or assistance for one-armers) was similar to the Lopez routine (i.e. similar added mass for 10s hangs 3 mins apart and 5x5s/5s repeaters, 5 mins apart).

http://crusherholdsclimbing.blogspot.co.uk/ (http://crusherholdsclimbing.blogspot.co.uk/)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on June 17, 2017, 07:11:32 pm
Eric Karlsson YouTube channel is fun to watch regarding indoor bouldering.
He's in America at the moment and created the following training videos with Will Anglin.

Overview
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=v4UzTrsjcS8 (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=v4UzTrsjcS8)
Power endurance
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=puQPbkwDFyw (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=puQPbkwDFyw)
Shoulders
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jTJYTtpMLXc (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jTJYTtpMLXc)
Body tension
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iOqqRAGBZBk (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iOqqRAGBZBk)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: jfdm on September 14, 2017, 09:13:17 pm
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UcWN8F1O928 (https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UcWN8F1O928)
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: slackline on December 11, 2017, 02:53:55 pm
https://beta-angel.com/
Title: Re: resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles)
Post by: thekettle on December 11, 2017, 07:04:54 pm
Fantastic link there Slackline, I would wad you if I could work out how :kiss2:

Recent resources I'd recommend are http://simplestrengthbook.com/ (http://simplestrengthbook.com/) by Mercedes Pollmeier:
A good strength-progression book for those on the road or expedition,as no exercises need equipment. A nice profiling progression for coaches too, split into three basic movement categories: The press, the squat and the back bend. Not sure why pulling and the hip hinge have been excluded though. For serious climbers I think most of the progressions will be a bit too easy (hardest squat option is pistol, hardest press is 1hand/1leg push-up), but the back bend should give most a good challenge! All in all loads of good mobility and strength exercises well presented.

And also https://theclimbingdoctor.com/product/climb-injury-free-5/ (https://theclimbingdoctor.com/product/climb-injury-free-5/) by physio Jared Vagy:
Another injury book to complement Dave Macleods and Volker Schoffels, this one is very much a DIY rehab book, with good clear progressions for a selection of common injuries. Nice to see nerve glides in there alongside the usual stuff. The movement advice given at the end of each program is very basic and sometimes dodgy (eg 'to avoid pulley injuries, perform more static movements'), and sometimes contradicts a different piece of advice. Also slightly too many [43 pages of] glossy-photo'd celebrity endorsements (what do they know about injuries, are they doctors?) and shirt-off finger rehab shots for my uptight English tastes.