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Is improvement in technique 99% confidence (Read 2896 times)

Wellsy

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Is improvement in technique 99% confidence
September 23, 2022, 09:06:35 pm
Technique is a very complex thing that ties into strength and condition, feeling on the day, and so on. That said I've definitely noticed that I'm much better at moves when I'm feeling confident on them; perhaps because they feel safe and secure, perhaps because they are in a problem with a grade that feels like it "should" go etc. It makes moves go faster, smoother and more easily.

To me it seems, albeit with limited experience, that my technique is vastly better when I am confident; trusting feet, committing to moves etc. This makes me wonder whether a big element of technical training is just feeling like you can definitely do the move so you just bang it out? I'd be curious as to the thoughts of the forums cognoscenti on this because it feels very relevant to how one trains

Johnny Brown

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No, itís the other way round.

ĎNothing gives you confidence like techniqueí - Fawcett on Rock

Duncan campbell

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Isnít technique having really weak fingers, but still doing the move anyway? 

cheque

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Physical capability, skill and confidence have complex reciprocal relationships with each other in climbing that are pretty much impossible to quantify and thatís a big part of why itís so much fun.

Fultonius

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Technique is a very complex thing that ties into strength and condition, feeling on the day, and so on. That said I've definitely noticed that I'm much better at moves when I'm feeling confident on them; perhaps because they feel safe and secure, perhaps because they are in a problem with a grade that feels like it "should" go etc. It makes moves go faster, smoother and more easily.

To me it seems, albeit with limited experience, that my technique is vastly better when I am confident; trusting feet, committing to moves etc. This makes me wonder whether a big element of technical training is just feeling like you can definitely do the move so you just bang it out? I'd be curious as to the thoughts of the forums cognoscenti on this because it feels very relevant to how one trains

I think ultimate technique is about being on the fine line of success and failure, but staying cool, trusting your abilities and making it happen. Seeing someone objectively way weaker than you makes moves you can't, only reinforces that so much is in the head.

Movement and skill, for those who aren't the avant garde, who develop new techniques and *really* push the boundaries, is all about emulation, simulation and really finding the flow. I think this comes best from climbing with people just a little bit above you, and usually weaker...  20 years since I started climbing and I'm still figuring it out...

Hoseyb

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For myself, I consider technique to be defined as:
"The most efficient ergonomic solution to the problem."

Therefore, I'm more in JB's camp. However, having the confidence to apply an atypical solution to a problem where doubt is present with speed and flawless execution....

That's where the magic happens

Wellsy

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Interesting perspectives, thanks all

mrjonathanr

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The best Masterclass on technique I ever saw was Andy Pollitt repeatedly failing to redpoint Oyster at Pen Trwyn.  Heíd climb really smoothly and precisely, get halfway through the crux move, look like he was rinsing it and suddenly be in the air.

It took about 4 goes before I realised he must be totally in bulk on that move, but be so disciplined he could keep his focus 100% as he attempted to move through it. Thatís technique.

abarro81

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For some techniques/moves I agree with you Wellsy - I can think of plenty of heels and knees where it's key to trust them, and as soon as you start worrying about them slipping (rather than fully committing without hesitation) they become much harder. A weighted foot/heel/knee never slips and all that...

Wellsy

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That was very much my line of thinking. I feel like if I could dial my confidence to max on every move I'd not just climber much harder, but much better too, more precise and secure feet, better executed deadlines and dynos etc. I'd move much better tech-wise

abarro81

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Yup, I agree. I also think it applies to the technique of individual moves (e.g. weighting a heel) but also often to pacing and going for things on an onsight - for limit onsights I have to climb much more aggressively and not hold back. (I'm thinking sport here, not dangerous trad obviously!)

Bradders

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This is partly why highball boulders often have physically less difficult climbing than lowballs at the same grade; it's much harder to move with confidence, and therefore good (or perhaps rather successful) technique, when high off the deck.

Moo

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I reckon as with everything confidence comes with experience. Climbing on a range of styles and rock types with good style ( ie not just trying to drag yourself up something ) will build technique quicker.

I think people often want to dive in at the deep end of their limit grade wise but climbing a good volume of easier stuff in good style is certainly good for building technique.

SA Chris

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Technique is (surely) your repertoire of movement, experience is knowing where and when to use them, and confidence is being able to unhesitatingly commit to the right technique to do the move.

Generally  agree with cheque though, it's all linked in one monstrous Venn diagram. Why it's so brilliant.

JamieG

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Iíve been mulling this over and I think an overlooked aspect of climbing technique is proprioception. Knowing exactly how far you need to pull for the next hold. The feeling under your feet. Excellent balance. If you have good proprioception I suspect you climb smoothly without much wasted energy and movement. Hard thing to train, but Iím sure improves with experience. I suspect people often call it Ďtalentí since it looks like it comes easy.

SA Chris

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Agree this knowledge comes from a large volume of climbing on a wide variety of rock types and angles.


MischaHY

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In my opinion one of the key reasons people struggle to improve technique is because skill learning needs to be done at a very low intensity/speed and then gradually intensified until the more complex movement can be executed at higher intensity/speed.

An example of how I've coached people on it would be like this (RPE in relation to flash grade):

Stage 1: RPE 3/10. Improving precision through targeted bouldering practice.

Stage 2: RPE 5/10. Balancing loading through the kinetic chain by improving full-body movement efficiency.

Stage 3: RPE 7/10. Increasing speed of execution whilst maintaining quality of movement.

Stage 4: RPE 9-10/10. Raising intensity to max and post-max levels (in flash) to apply the improved technique at a high intensity level.

The problem as I see it is that many people try to complete all technique training at the RPE of stage 3 or 4 which doesn't allow sufficient margin to change movement patterns.

tomtom

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From recently trying a new non climbing sport/activity - itís practice and repetition. This then leads to confidence (often by doing the move/action unconsciously as youíve practiced it so many times etc..).

 

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