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The Future of Indoor Climbing (Read 20979 times)

Catcheemonkey

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#25 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 01, 2017, 12:00:31 pm
Just saw this: http://www.klattercentret.se/akalla/the-black-diamond-project/

Is this a case of multiple discovery of a desire for permanent benchmark plastic by independent great minds?

Muenchener

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#26 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 01, 2017, 04:16:00 pm
Istr Jan Hojer saying in an interview his greatest achievement in bouldering was the yellow roof problem at his local wall

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#27 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 01, 2017, 05:34:15 pm
Just saw this: http://www.klattercentret.se/akalla/the-black-diamond-project/

Is this a case of multiple discovery of a desire for permanent benchmark plastic by independent great minds?

This route already has a following on youtube.




Not watched the third one yet - these are all about the setting of the route
The first one shows just the holds  :-\
The second clip shows the initial setting and the joys of this job -  ;D
The route looks epic.

Steve R

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#28 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 05, 2017, 01:28:57 am
I heard about this: http://www.rock-up.co.uk for the first time today.  Potentially a more lucrative business than a standard commercial bouldering wall and more feasible in areas with a low existing climber population?  At a glance it looks like these places could quite easily spring up everywhere. cf. trampoline centres. 

Anyway, in terms of evolution of facilities in the future, maybe we'll see these types of places catering for the kids party end of the market* with more relatively small members only 24/7 training facilities (school room style) for the dedicated end of the market** and regular commercial walls catering for everything in between (and overlapping at the edges) as they do already.

*hope so
**hope so again

Steve R

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#29 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 05, 2017, 01:32:19 am
just read the above back, pun entirely unintentional

Lurker

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#30 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 06, 2017, 02:06:01 pm
Ooh, first post - shiny!

Following on from some comments on the BMC thread, noteably...

Quote from: Shark
Talking to Steve Dunning at the Depot a lot of the newcomers seemed surprised that a. people climbed outside b. would want to and c. would travel the world to do so.

I was genuinely surprised by this and whilst I know there are a lot of new climbers who don't climb outside, I kind of felt they knew that it was based on "real" climbing and would somehow aspire to do this eventually...

I'm not sure if the 'newcomers' referred to in that were specifically people they'd spoken to at the Depot, but if it was then I can see how that'd be the case.  There seem to be quite a few people who go there who seem to be crossfitters/gym refugees (either have that "skipped leg day" vibe, or are surprised they can't kip their way up things), so I can see that to them it'd just be a 'thing' you did at a place like that.  For them it probably is just a functional thing, so they wouldn't have any interest in where it might have come from or where it might take them - as an after work exercise/fitness option it's ideal.  It seems 'Movement' is the new buzzword in the fitness industry and I've seen a few podcasts specifically mention bouldering/climbing as being a good thing to do for that reason.  With places like the Depot in Manchester and - say - the Climbing Lab in Leeds being nicely finished, well laid out places with a good atmosphere and good problems set for people who are new I can see it catching on more with people from that kind of background.

Thaaaaaaaat said, I'm still relatively new myself, and although I want to do more outdoors stuff as I'm flying solo the whole time it makes it a little more of a daunting task.  I've got some pads and I've cajoled someone into going to Shipley Glen with me before (it's a location we both knew from riding bikes, and he had a guide book that covered it), but in terms of actually going out and doing stuff on my own, if it's a choice between not really knowing what I'm doing on a crag somewhere vs. sipping my flat white like a prick between flailing at some plastic at the Depot it's pretty easy to just go for the latter.  I should probably point out that I've spent the past 15-20 years fucking around on bikes and I spent a lot of that time out riding on my own, and finding and developing new spots, but with bouldering it feels different somehow and I'm a bit more reluctant to do it.  I've scoped out a few places not too far from me and had a wonder around by Cromlech/Llanberis when I happened to be passing, but because I haven't got any experience with it I haven't really committed too much to it just yet.

I think I probably made that first trip outdoors worse than it needed to be because I'd got some fairly niche techniques/habits that weren't super useful outdoors because of the way most of the problems were set at my then-local, but I imagine that my situation is fairly representative of people who have just started climbing indoors.  All the videos I watch online/articles I read/photos I look at are of people outdoors, but actually doing it feels like a step too far for me at the moment.  Climbing indoor is just an easy fall-back option, and because it's always changing it's hard for it to feel stale so that catalyst for getting people outdoors isn't necessarily there.  Also, free pizza Fridays at the Lab - I'm not not going to take advantage of that...

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#31 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 06, 2017, 03:02:55 pm
Quote from: Shark
Talking to Steve Dunning at the Depot a lot of the newcomers seemed surprised that a. people climbed outside b. would want to and c. would travel the world to do so.

I'm not sure if the 'newcomers' referred to in that were specifically people they'd spoken to at the Depot, but if it was then I can see how that'd be the case.  There seem to be quite a few people who go there who seem to be crossfitters/gym refugees (either have that "skipped leg day" vibe, or are surprised they can't kip their way up things), so I can see that to them it'd just be a 'thing' you did at a place like that.....

Coincidentally, I got chatting to a young couple at the Depot over the weekend who were both keen and quite able and keen to improve.  They were trying to figure out the best way of using the fingerboards and campus board in the hope of pushing on from the "reds" (V3-V5ish) to the "purples" (V5-V7ish) - so hardly gym refugees.  They were surprised when I said I, and most people I know, preferred climbing outdoors and viewed indoors largely as a cold/wet weather fall-back option or a training tool.  They had seemingly never considered climbing outdoors themselves. 

I wonder if indoors being seen as the default is a consequence of more and more people starting young and being largely limited to local walls for their formative years?  I didn't start climbing until my late 20s, so after about a year of trying to access crags by bus, I could buy a car and get out to crags on my own - the first place I ever drove to unaccompanied was Shaftoe. 

I agree with Lurker that solo trips can be a bit intimidating sometimes - I reckon my very slow, static climbing style is a legacy of a few trips that ended in painful limps back to the car.  Nothing like nearly crippling yourself at a fogbound and deserted Goldsborough Carr to make you determined to never do a move you can't carefully reverse!

nai

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#32 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 06, 2017, 07:41:04 pm
if it's a choice between not really knowing what I'm doing on a crag somewhere vs. sipping my flat white like a prick between flailing at some plastic at the Depot it's pretty easy to just go for the latté

 :coffee:

SA Chris

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#33 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 06, 2017, 08:47:11 pm
Beat me to it nai! I'm curious as to how many else on here are full time "indoorers". I probably don't touch rock from about October to March, but that's mainly because it's dark, why and the rock is inaccessible due to the sea most of the winter

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#34 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 06, 2017, 08:53:54 pm
There seem to be quite a few people who go there who seem to be crossfitters/gym refugees (either have that "skipped leg day" vibe, or are surprised they can't kip their way up things), so I can see that to them it'd just be a 'thing' you did at a place like that.  For them it probably is just a functional thing, so they wouldn't have any interest in where it might have come from or where it might take them - as an after work exercise/fitness option it's ideal. 

A colleague of mine, who most certainly isn't a crossfitter, informed me the other day that he's thinking of taking up - indoor - climbing because his doctor recommended it to him as a form of general healthy exercise. (My GP is a climber, but afaik he wasn't the doc concerned)

I pointed him at a few beginners groups at some of the local walls but I'm also debating whether to offer my own coaching services. I don't on the face of it expect to ever see the guy outside, but you never know; in five years time he might be my alpine rope gun. I need a fallback plan in case the lad continues to be only interested in bouldering.

Lurker

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#35 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 06, 2017, 09:19:03 pm
My friend who first got me into it was useful as an initial mentor as he and his girlfriend climbed outdoors quite a bit, but he lost interest in it after a month or two so I lost that kind of resource.  I've got a friend I meet up with once a week or so now who's the one who I went outdoors with before, and he's also really useful as he has more of a clue than me, and also has friends who go outdoors much more often too so it's all starting to join up a bit now.  What I'm getting at is that your friend will probably get a lot out of it if you're just around having a session too, rather than you specifically going into training plan mode and all that jazz.  I've lurked here a bunch and also read a lot of climbing websites online, but it's not really the same as having someone with experience who's there with you who can guide you through some aspects of it or answer random questions you've got.  You can watch all the technique videos you want, but a friend going "Maybe you should try doing it like this..." does a lot more for driving points home.

Also, if I was wearing a hat I'd take it off to you Nai.

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#36 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 05:44:20 am
Lurker: :w00t:

It sounds as though you may be overthinking it to an extent. It's only playing about on some rocks.
Buy a guidebook, go somewhere with loads of easy stuff, if it's not too high/intimidating have a go at getting from the bottom to the top.
Tons and tons of problems all over that are half the height of stuff down the wall.
I've also found that bumping into people at the crag is much better for making climbing mates.
I've only been to Shipley Glen once so my memory is a little vague but I'm fairly sure t wasn't very lowball. Maybe head somewhere else. Almscliff must have had over 60 boulderers there last time I went, at all levels and abilities, with problems of all different heights.
I'm sure someone on here will have some good, easy, low, beginner areas to recommend :)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 05:50:10 am by deacon »

SA Chris

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#37 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 09:54:10 am
There's a load of low safe stuff at Shipley too, especially directly beneath the car park. You just need to understand few concepts like safe pad placement, and how to read the guidebook and figure out where the problems actually are which, with a place like shipley can be a bit bewildering.

Catcheemonkey

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#38 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 10:32:30 am
There'll definitely be stuff you can get on at Almscliff - my recommendation for a first outside crag near Leeds though would be Little Almscliff a few miles down the road.

I've taken a few people there for their first time outside and they all got on well with it. You get views and isolation but most of the climbing is quite amenable.

lemony

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#39 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 11:13:27 am
I'm increasingly aware that I'd much rather have a really good indoor session than an fairly average outdoor one. A few hours at Bowden or Hepburn on a glorious autumn day is always going to beat Climb Newcastle but pulling on Shaftoe scrittle over a muddy puddle does less and less for me.

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#40 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 11:25:04 am
With places like the Depot in Manchester and - say - the Climbing Lab in Leeds being nicely finished, well laid out places with a good atmosphere and good problems set for people who are new I can see it catching on more with people from that kind of background.

With regards to the Climbing Lab, I can't remember seeing any guidebooks (or general outdoor equipment) for sale. If this is the case it's easy to imagine how beginners don't make the connection between climbing indoors and climbing outdoors.

For me, owning a guide book was easily the main catalyst for venturing outside. After spending many days trawling through all the wonderful looking venues and conjuring up sequences for the various 3 star climbs I couldn't wait to get out. 

36chambers

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#41 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 11:41:08 am
I'm increasingly aware that I'd much rather have a really good indoor session than an fairly average outdoor one. A few hours at Bowden or Hepburn on a glorious autumn day is always going to beat Climb Newcastle but pulling on Shaftoe scrittle over a muddy puddle does less and less for me.

I recently came to a similar conclusion this winter. Having gambled many cold, miserable, windy, dark, lonely winter evenings camping under various pieces of rock, when the connies still suck, and trying to bring life back to my toes and fingers. Hoping to either climb the damn problem or split a tip so I could go home. I decided that I'd have more chance of doing said problems if I spent those days training indoors and only go out when it's guaranteed to be bon. 

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#42 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 11:56:09 am
I decided that I'd have more chance of doing said problems if I spent those days training indoors and only go out when it's guaranteed to be bon. 

The problem with that approach is that, 1, that guaranteed good connies day might never happen, and 2, when it does, you're putting yourself under a lot of pressure to perform.

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#43 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 01:05:15 pm
I decided that I'd have more chance of doing said problems if I spent those days training indoors and only go out when it's guaranteed to be bon. 

The problem with that approach is that, 1, that guaranteed good connies day might never happen, and 2, when it does, you're putting yourself under a lot of pressure to perform.

The life of a weekend warrior.

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#44 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 01:07:18 pm
I think you spell it weakened.

dave

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#45 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 01:27:22 pm
I decided that I'd have more chance of doing said problems if I spent those days training indoors and only go out when it's guaranteed to be bon. 

The problem with that approach is that, 1, that guaranteed good connies day might never happen, and 2, when it does, you're putting yourself under a lot of pressure to perform.

The life of a weekend warrior.

Yeah, tell me about it!

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#46 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 01:57:14 pm
There's a load of low safe stuff at Shipley too, especially directly beneath the car park. You just need to understand few concepts like safe pad placement, and how to read the guidebook and figure out where the problems actually are which, with a place like shipley can be a bit bewildering.

Yeah, we eventually found some less sketchy (to us) feeling stuff which helped build the confidence up.  Working out where problems were from the guidebook was a bit tricky at first just because of the nature of Shipley (I was bad enough remembering where bits were to ride on), but once we did it was fine.

Cheers for the hints/tips from people though, much appreciated :)

Lurker

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#47 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 07, 2017, 01:58:47 pm
With regards to the Climbing Lab, I can't remember seeing any guidebooks (or general outdoor equipment) for sale. If this is the case it's easy to imagine how beginners don't make the connection between climbing indoors and climbing outdoors.

For me, owning a guide book was easily the main catalyst for venturing outside. After spending many days trawling through all the wonderful looking venues and conjuring up sequences for the various 3 star climbs I couldn't wait to get out.

Not sure how long ago you went there but they seem to have recently upped their game as far as shop stuff goes, and have put in a new little point-of-sale type unit.  Think there was some stuff dotted around there but couldn't say for sure...

Will Hunt

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#48 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 08, 2017, 11:55:18 am
Lurker, you're definitely overthinking it. Go to Almscliff, try and climb the rocks. The basic rules of looking after the rock: only ever stepping on with clean shoes; not chipping; and not over chalking/brushing are simple to follow.
If you meet up with other climbers then feel free to say its your first time out and ask if they can point you at some easy problems. If anybody thinks to sneer at you because you're new to it then they're a dickhead.

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#49 Re: The Future of Indoor Climbing
February 09, 2017, 02:02:40 pm
I assume maybe 50% of people at the wall rarely go outside - no science attached to that - and have been slightly taken aback overhearing people talking about actual Real Life Climbing. It's not a new thing though - I've been out with a guy recently that's climbed for maybe 6 or 7 years. I've taken him outside for the first time to some fairly miserable, esoteric venues and he still LOVES it :)

 

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