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resources: Training (Coaches, books and web articles) (Read 84064 times)

Murph

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So feet/foot on campusing for power?

Oldmanmatt

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Power needs to be trained at loads of 30-60% of max, at as high velocity as possible for the given load. Very very few people can train power by pulling footless.

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Regardng the last sentence. This depends on the available equipment. If you are using a Campus board, sure, because most people lack the finger strength/conditioning.
However, if you take finger strength as separate issue during initial build up; a bar provides all you need. Starting with pull-up catches (where you pull up dynamically and briefly release the bar at the apex of the move), progressing through pull-up claps, Pull-up reaches (reaching as high above the bar as possible with each hand in turn) and eventually Muscle -ups.
Also, over sized Campus rungs or a rigid Bachar ladder, allow for a phased intro into footless Campusing.


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jwi

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If you can do a single pullup (two arms) at or close to double bodyweight, by all mean train to increase power by doing quick pullups, otherwise some form of aid is needed. Steep board climbing w/ long moves?

Nibile

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Ok so that workout is a bit of everything.

But the campus routine, that is training power yeah? Or not at all? Or is the criticism that it is inferior to, say, a plyometric campus routine? Sorry if this is a dumb question...

Asking cos strength is not one of my weaknesses but "going for it" is, which is possibly because of a lack of power (as well as general technical crapness). I am looking to address this weakness in the coming months through embarking on some form of campus routine but currently shopping around for what to actually do this nice I get under the board.
As others have said, speed is the essential component of power. So, to increase power you need to work at speed, whatever you do.
Regular campusing isn't fast enough, it's a bit more grinding through, and there also could be the fingers limiting factor.
Fast pull ups on a bar could be a good way to go, but as of late I'm getting more and more interested in full body power, because it has a greater effect on overall power output, nervous recruitment, etc.
So, I'm doing hill sprints, boxing bag, Olympic-style lifting, and even normal weights, focusing on speed.
Contrast training is also very useful and effective, but you have to be prepared.

In any case, if you feel that "going for it" is your weakness, I don't think it's related to power. To me it seems more a matter of "knack", of trying to latch the next hold despite being close to falling. I think that you could see good gains by practicing quite dynamic climbing, using holds that you can't lock off, so that you get used to go for it in an all out effort.
On the other hand, you can still become so strong that "going fo it" isn't anymore necessary.
 ;D

Murph

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Thanks chaps lots of powerful advice here much appreciated.

I guess I'm drawn to the campus board because it seems pretty systematic to record training sessions and thereby set the bar higher next time. At least that's the attraction compared to limit bouldering where more variables and distractions  come into play. But it isn't the only option and, as nibs said, could just be ground out which won't help with power much/at all.

Thanks specially for the pull up variation ideas. It's not just about weighted slow pulls with "good" form. Think I can make that work actually.

And as to the "become so strong" suggestion.... haha, yes of course for a specific problem but then it wouldn't be the limit any more, surely?!  :worms:

Murph

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If you can do a single pullup (two arms) at or close to double bodyweight, by all mean train to increase power by doing quick pullups otherwise...

Hello, are you saying I would need to do 2x bw pull ups to train power on a pull-up bar? I can do nowhere near that, surely just doing some pull ups quickly with the aim of getting air time etc, as per OMMs suggestion would be a solid road to seeing gains?

tomtom

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Reading this article makes my elbows hurt :D

Oldmanmatt

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I would say I was quite strong, but I have a PB of 64kg additional for 3 reps @75kg BW.
For ref, I can 1:5:7 on medium (24mm) rungs and 2:6:9 (matching) on large (34mm) rungs with a 4kg weight belt. (21cm spacing).
I know this is "average" or "meh" as Campusing goes.


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« Last Edit: October 23, 2016, 08:54:51 pm by Oldmanmatt »

Brannock

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Steve House has a new website, mostly around selling training plans/coaching but also has some articles on Alpinism/mountain running/skimo etc.

jfdm

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jfdm

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What goes on during lattice test.
I'd love to have a go but don't meet the entry requirements just yet.

slackline

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thekettle

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Not strictly climbing, but for those that strength train off the wall, I think this is an excellent read. All about taking a biomechanically sound approach to strength training, reducing stress on the joints and spine:
https://www.amazon.com/Congruent-Exercise-Weight-Training-Easier/dp/1467930415

jfdm

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One for the dead hangers, top work from Dave.

moose

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Looks very similar to the Lopez protocol:



My own  Lopez derived regime, employed when enthused / ovewhelmed by the difficulty of a project, is to calibrate by finding the max added weight for a 13s hang.  Then, each session, after a suitable warm-up (I do 6x7/3s repeaters on a 18mm edge, followed by the same on 14, 12, and 10 mm edges) I do a progression of 10s hangs at 50%, 80%, and 90% of the max. 

The meat of the session is then 10s hangs at the max added weight (as many as I can manage, generally 5-8). 

Every 3-4 weeks I change to a different sized hold (I tend to alternate between 18mm and 12-14mm - any smaller and skin loss / pain raher than finger strength seem to become limiting).   

Main problem using big holds is that the amount of added weight for 2 arm hangs can become intolerable.  I  had a few sessions of putting on the weight belt / weighted harness etc, falling over, and being unable to stand up!  One-armers with a pulley and assistance are more comfortable - the sessions just take a little longer. 

Currently in such a "max hang" phase, scared into it by  how weak I feel after a long hiatus from fingerboarding (just used a woodie instead over winter).  Thankfully, I am slowly reverting to my old marks.  When I do, given that I have a power-endurance project, I think changing to Probes' 5x5x5x5 routine would be appropriate - I recall that programme felt horrendous, which suggests it was beneficial!  Incidentally, although the calibration routines are different, I found that the actual amount of added weight (or assistance for one-armers) was similar to the Lopez routine (i.e. similar added mass for 10s hangs 3 mins apart and 5x5s/5s repeaters, 5 mins apart).

http://crusherholdsclimbing.blogspot.co.uk/

jfdm

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Eric Karlsson YouTube channel is fun to watch regarding indoor bouldering.
He's in America at the moment and created the following training videos with Will Anglin.

Overview

Power endurance

Shoulders

Body tension

jfdm

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